The company behind plans to build one of the largest offshore wind projects in the world spoke of the potential of Great Yarmouth and Lowestoft ports in its construction and operation.

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East Anglia Offshore Wind - which is a joint venture between ScottishPower Renewables and Vattenfall - announced today that it has signed a memorandum of understanding with both International Port Holdings (IPH) of Great Yarmouth Port Company and Associated British Ports which owns Lowestoft.

This means the company will now enter into discussions with local authorities to investigate the potential of the two towns and their ports for the project.

The proposed development could deliver 7,200 MW of offshore wind capacity, and would meet the equivalent electricity needs of over five million UK households.

East Anglia Offshore Wind programme director Jason Martin said: “Our discussions with local port operators demonstrate the strong offshore energy support services and experience in the region and we are currently building our technical and economic case to allow our construction and operations activities to be focused on this part of the country.

He added: “We really are focused on East Anglia and our intention will be that we create construction and operations jobs in East Anglia. It is not something we are being virtuous about. It costs money to get to the sites and we would prefer to be local to our operation. We see ports that have the technical capabilities..”

The 7.2GW development will be built in several sections with the proposed first project, expected to start in 2015, will consist of approximately 240 turbines.

It is proposed that the first project will be located 42 kilometres offshore and will have the capacity to generate up to 1.2GW of clean, green energy.

Last July ScottishPower Renewables and Vattenfall, awarded Great Yarmouth company, Gardline Hydro a multi million pound contract to conduct seabed surveys on the first section of the site.

28 comments

  • The largest windfarm in Britain, which was completed last year of the Thanet coast, only emloyed 30 per cent of its workforce, from the local community. The project was also built by Vattenfall .

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    Do you know I'm not a councillor

    Wednesday, November 2, 2011

  • Nothing coming through the town? What about the local companies supporting the operations? Taxis ferrying people, companies repairing the barges & jackups, servicing the vessels, supplying food and stores to the vessels, carrying out maintenance, alterations, engine works, elctrical works. The haulage companies transporting grain from around the county to the grain terminal. What about all the extra employment that brings, or at very least secures existing jobs. Do you choose not to acknowledge all this Mr Cooper so that you can continue with your spreading of doom and gloom? This announcement could be HUGE for this area, and all you can do is put it down. Why not try praising EastPort for their efforts in getting the big players on board with this? You may not agree with how the outer harbour came to be, but it's here now so stop whining and support it. It's the best chance GY has of prospering again.

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    Tea&Biscuits

    Monday, October 31, 2011

  • Hi Guys, exciting news! I think this will open huge oppotunities to not just local people to great yarmouth but also people around the whole of east anglia, does anyone know how someone would go about applying for this type of work in the future?

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    David Murray

    Tuesday, November 1, 2011

  • Dogberry - GY has a world leading supply chain in the energy sector, but you are right that more training opportunities for energy trades need to be made available to local people over the coming years. Whilst our road and rail infrastructure holds us back, in this instance it won't make a difference as the materials are coming across sea to ports, being stored, then heading back out to sea. It certainly needs improving though if GY is ever to be either a ferry or container port.

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    DT

    Thursday, November 3, 2011

  • We are where we are because of ignorance. Take a look into the outer harbour you will see equipment being shipped from barge to barge. Nothing coming through the town Yes a few taxis are occupied, with crew changes a few grain ships coming in. The outer harbour cost tax and ratepayers about 69.5 million it was given grants to provide jobs. It was sold to the public as a ferry port. What have we a failed Container port the ferry company put off coming the harbour with a built in swell problem and look over the fences it’s a barren waste. Four years and we are no further forward Now they are trying to narrow the entrance because the changed the design that Ratepayers paid for. Sorry but you get real

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    John L Cooper

    Monday, October 31, 2011

  • I read here some comments relating to jobs coming in to the area because of the wind farms and the concern about whether locals can fill the positions. It should not be expected that there are enough unemployed experts in this new technology sitting around GY and Lowestoft to fill these positions. If we get 30%, as quoted in another post, we should be very happy. But what is glossed over is that people who come in to the area to work will be eating, shopping, living and paying taxes here and that will in turn create jobs and benefit the local economy greatly. Eventually local people can be retrained to work in the jobs, but that will take time. In the meantime, I welcome every new worker who moves in to the area and contributes to the local economy.

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    Alice Taylor

    Sunday, November 6, 2011

  • Hi Guys, exciting news! I think this will open huge oppotunities to not just local people to great yarmouth but also people around the whole of east anglia, does anyone know how someone would go about applying for this type of work in the future?

    Report this comment

    David Murray

    Tuesday, November 1, 2011

  • So the world's biggest windfarm is being built off the Norfolk coast, with the companies constructing the thing looking like they will use our port for years to come and you think that wouldn't lead to any jobs, John? Get real, of course it will!!! The guy quoted talks about jobs in construction and operations - of which the latter must surely relate to them needing to bring some of this stuff quayside? Whether local people have the skills to access the jobs is the real issue.

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    DT

    Monday, October 31, 2011

  • "The design the ratepayers paid for should not have been changed" says John Cooper. And that has what to do with whether the port would have proved a success or not? The answer being nothing. We were told that the port was to be built to attract ferries and container vessels. Those plans didn't work out, probably due to an enormous recession rather than swell, so they have adapted and gone after renewable energy business. And with the future for this county being so bright in that sector, that decision can't be questioned in my opinion. I'm sure most businesses in the town want to see ferries here (although most would then whinge about the traffic impact), but Eastport seem to know that's not going to be happening any time soon and have gone after other sectors which brings in business for them, but which also leads to both direct and indirect employment in the area. If they've had to adapt the design to deal with smaller ships to suit that sector then so what!? The taxpayer isn't picking up the extra cost for that work - they are. Businesses adapt or they die.

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    DT

    Wednesday, November 2, 2011

  • Some very passionate comments here, but perhaps the short one by Do you know I'm not a councillor should be paid heed to...we need this development to bring employment benefits to local people in the North SuffolkEast Norfolk area.Also, there will always be a problem for as long as successive governments of all colours fail to sort out the road and rail infrastructure to the port towns of Lowestoft and Great Yarmouth.

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    Dogberry

    Thursday, November 3, 2011

  • The Kent example is clearly a bad one, but even if it was repeated, 30% of a lot of new jobs is better than 100% of none! The road is not going to be sorted out anytime soon so I suggest we just work with what we have got and get on with it and stop whingeing!

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    Local Dad

    Saturday, November 5, 2011

  • Port Watcher, there is indeed more to this than Eastport. Most people are simply responding to the first contribution below - the usual negative diatribe from Mr Cooper. It's good to see a few more people responding to his drivel. The simple fact is that unless he can count people in overalls swarming over the port, he refuses to see the wider benefits the port is bringing.

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    Tom Jeffries

    Tuesday, November 1, 2011

  • I thought this report was about "the potential of the two towns and their ports" not just Yarmouth's Outer Harbour! There are other important aspects of this report, including the fact that the windfarm will also be off Suffolk and that other ports such as Harwich make good construction bases.

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    Port Watcher

    Tuesday, November 1, 2011

  • Some links for those who are interested._http:www.bbc.co.uknewsuk-england-kent-11395964 and _http:www.bbc.co.uknewsscience-environment-14478226

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    Do you know I'm not a councillor

    Wednesday, November 2, 2011

  • At last, some positive comment, instead of the usual drivel from the likes of Mr Cooper and his handful of knockers - there's an intentional euphemism in there. You keep asking where the jobs are coming from, and here they are looking like they are about to land in the town in a big way and you still drone on about the same old nonsense that no-one else cares about. Change the record, or find a new cause for heaven's sake, because you're about to look pretty stupid - even more so than usual. And where on earth do you get these ridiculous figures from? Do you use a random number generator?

    Report this comment

    Tom Jeffries

    Monday, October 31, 2011

  • very strange comments

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    Mr sense_brundall

    Tuesday, November 1, 2011

  • I thought this report was about "the potential of the two towns and their ports" not just Yarmouth's Outer Harbour! There are other important aspects of this report, including the fact that the windfarm will also be off Suffolk and that other ports such as Harwich make good construction bases.

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    Port Watcher

    Tuesday, November 1, 2011

  • Well Tom Jeffries have some tea & biscuits while we wait on this wonder to happen How many promises have there been in four years. Can you tell me how many workers from here are working on the barges? Difficult! Have the number of taxis increased? Yes work in the town is being done on R.E. but not because of the outer harbour. There is nothing noticeable going through the town. Even the grain terminal has just imported staff on its books. And the latest work to reduce swell, will it work? Doubtful, the design ratepayers paid for should not have been changed.

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    John L Cooper

    Tuesday, November 1, 2011

  • Kent – hardly known for its offshore energy capabilities! Companies from this area worked on Thanet and I daresay some of the 70% of the non-local workforce came from this region also. Don’t undersell our region – it is known worldwide for its offshore energy capabilities – for skills developed over 45 years working in the oil and gas sector which are transferable to the renewable sector. Working on the basis of the employment figure quoted below, - only 30% of local employment. Well, that’s 70% of the workforce moving (or returning) to the area all in long term employment requiring somewhere to live and spend their wages in the local economy.

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    sasha456

    Thursday, November 3, 2011

  • very strange comments

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    Mr sense_brundall

    Tuesday, November 1, 2011

  • Big Deal, or it would be if the Great Yarmouth Outer Harbour was functioning as it was promised in the Project Briefing that sold the idea of an outer harbour to Stakeholders. Face facts because the port is not capable of working heavy equipment from the quayside the best we can expect is as now. Equipment transfer barge to barge, no quay work NO JOBS so the only people to gain are the owners and financiers. The Grants to build were given to provide jobs, but to date the grants have been used to build something not fit for purpose, and a deprived area is still deprived

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    John L Cooper

    Monday, October 31, 2011

  • Mr cooper - it is quite clear to everybody that you are very much 'on your own here' to say the least... your thoughts and comments are so wide of the mark and very negative - if you read the comments listed and listen to the local people, you would understand the following......FACT work already being generated from the outer harbours utilization in the wind energy sector is having a major impact on the town... FACT employment IS being created everyday in the town, FACT investment is coming into town, FACT the Company I work for has spent near 2 million pound and is employing new staff - FACT you know nothing about business or industry.... FACT people are tired of your one man crusade, I have said it before and i will say it again - the outer harbour is a vehicle that the whole town and local business arena can and is seeing the benefits from.

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    Mr sense_brundall

    Tuesday, November 1, 2011

  • Well said Nick. Some people want to kid themselves that the outer harbour is bringing no benefit to the town at all. It may not be the ferries that we were told we were going to get, but there's industry using that port and many of them offer jobs locally as a result or use the supply chain - who recruit local people. These workers either stay in the town, or shop here, buy lunch, whatever. It may not be the busy ferry port that we all hoped for, but it's here and they are clearly doing what they can to get business. An outer harbour is better than no outer harbour. It's time to stop doing our town and everything here down. If the companies building this wind farm use our port over the course of the coming years then there will be jobs. The issue is whether local people can a) access training to be qualified to get them, and b) whether they have the work ethic to go out and get them.

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    DT

    Monday, October 31, 2011

  • I am rather nervous of venturing a comment here amid those of so many knowledgeable and well-informed observers, but here goes – I'm sure someone will soon put me right! This is very good news for Yarmouth and, hopefully, Lowestoft which is of more interest to me personally. It looks as if there will be a substantial number of skilled and well-paid jobs, and also further jobs in supporting industries and the East Coast economy as a whole. I do wonder whether there are sufficient people locally with suitable qualifications andor training to take up these jobs – especially since most of our maritime and manufacturing industries have been moribund for a while now - or whether they will go to a more mobile workforce from outside the area. My other concern is that the well-paid jobs are likely to go mainly to men. Women will probably continue to find themselves in low-paid office work, catering, retail and other professions traditionally serving maritime industry. In our area we really need to motivate girls to continue their education so that they want to aim for an interesting, well-paid job in a modern industry, instead of a 'career' of early motherhood and welfare dependency which seems to be for many the lifestyle of choice, or perhaps more accurately, no choice, in our area. When I have spoken to some of these young women, most seem unable to see any opportunities for themselves within the local area beyond doing each others nails, hair and tattoos or working behind a bar – all valid occupations, but there should be more. This project has the potential to break the cycle of deprivation in Lowestoft and Great Yarmouth. I hope it succeeds – but I'm not holding my breath!

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    point du jour

    Wednesday, November 2, 2011

  • There certainly is a lot of negativity being posted by individuals in the town, it's almost if they have an agenda to make the Outer Harbour fail. I read these posts with interest and clearly there is a debate to whether funds were misused or designs altered that have led to mistakes. But you cannot allow your opinions to be blinkered just because the promises are still to be honoured. No there is no ferry service or container terminal, creating mass employment, but don't under estimate the value already of this fledgling construction. Jobs are being created, they are certainly being saved in difficult economic times and although the evidence is difficult to see to the public eye, speak to local businesses and ask whether they are benefitting from the port. Lets be totally frank, if it wasn't for the Outer Harbour we would not be reading about the potential wind farm developments this morning. The old river port, which has been the lifeline of the town for decades cannot support these constructions and the vessels used to install them, it's simply not big enough. The project is in it's infancy, it's only been operational a couple of years, but it will be a servant of the borough for decades. I used to work at a port and as I drove to my office I used to pass a brass plackard commemorating its opening in the 17th century. This infrastructure is not a 5 yr deal, we have it forever! Maybe it was a lot of money for the public purse, maybe it could of been designed differently, but we have what we have, lets promote it and use it because it will reap the rewards. I work for a company who have used the harbour and maybe these details help give you all an idea to how local businesses benefit? employees 3 full time (all living within 25 miles) employees temporary 1-8 contracted in local companies used: Industrial supplies £5K annum GY company Fabrication £3500 GY company Fuel £31K Ipswich company Fire alarms extinguishers £3300 initial £250yr GY company. Burglar alarms £1400 GY company Pest Control £1500 per annum Suffolk company Elevated Platforms £500 GY company Cesspit empyting £1K Norwich company Hydraulic repairs £3K Norwich company Cleaning equipment £8K Norfolk companies Signage £1K Norwich company Plant Hire £6K GY company Stationery £1K GY company Electricians £2K GY company Diesel engine servicing £2K GY company Fencing £1K Suffolk company Haulage £100K Norfolk Suffolk hauliers These figures don't include port fees, business rates or electricity gas bills, they are purely day to day expenses and as you see Norfolk and particularly GY are benefitting. I work for a relatively small operation, what would a 7.2 Giga Watt Wind farm installation contribute to our local economy? Bring it on!!!!!

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    AC Barrie

    Tuesday, November 1, 2011

  • Having a modern working harbour was always a priority for this town. The fact that things did not work out as they were supposed to is one matter. At the end of the day we do now have something at least! After all these years! Yes it would have been great if Mc Kinney Muller had been listened to in the first place. We have wailed and gnashed our teeth ever since over what could have been. Like DT I say lets celebrate the future.

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    Nick

    Monday, October 31, 2011

  • Hi Guys, exciting news! I think this will open huge oppotunities to not just local people to great yarmouth but also people around the whole of east anglia, does anyone know how someone would go about applying for this type of work in the future?

    Report this comment

    David Murray

    Tuesday, November 1, 2011

  • "The design the ratepayers paid for should not have been changed" says John Cooper. And that has what to do with whether the port would have proved a success or not? The answer being nothing. We were told that the port was to be built to attract ferries and container vessels. Those plans didn't work out, probably due to an enormous recession rather than swell, so they have adapted and gone after renewable energy business. And with the future for this county being so bright in that sector, that decision can't be questioned in my opinion. I'm sure most businesses in the town want to see ferries here (although most would then whinge about the traffic impact), but Eastport seem to know that's not going to be happening any time soon and have gone after other sectors which brings in business for them, but which also leads to both direct and indirect employment in the area. If they've had to adapt the design to deal with smaller ships to suit that sector then so what!? The taxpayer isn't picking up the extra cost for that work - they are. Businesses adapt or they die.

    Report this comment

    DT

    Wednesday, November 2, 2011

The views expressed in the above comments do not necessarily reflect the views of this site

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