Allotment bonfires a nuisance

AS summer approaches we are at last able to start to enjoy the pleasures of the garden, picnics with the grandchildren, an occasional Sunday afternoon drink with friends … or just relaxing reading the newspaper.

AS summer approaches we are at last able to start to enjoy the pleasures of the garden, picnics with the grandchildren, an occasional Sunday afternoon drink with friends … or just relaxing reading the newspaper.

That is unless one happens to live near allotments.

For some reason best known to the allotment holders it seems that a beautiful summers day, particularly Sunday, is a good time to light a bonfire, belching smoke and fumes (heaven only knows what they burn) into our gardens and homes.

Of course sometimes they decide that another time would be more appropriate, when for instance we have just hung out a full line of washing and gone out for a while, only to return to find the washing has to be done all over again, and fumes throughout the house.


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I must add here that on bank holiday Sunday I remonstrated with one particular person and they apologised and extinguished the fire for which I am grateful. The only problem of course is that the damage was done. With our windows open our home was quickly engulfed in noxious fumes.

It seems that the council has the power to control noise, for example barking dogs, light pollution from over-powered halogen lighting and many other anti-social activities, but not the burning of rubbish.

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Surely, with today's emphasis on the climate and the problems of climate change, it would be a simple matter to prevent this increasing anti-social behavior?

Is it not possible to compost much of the waste? Could the council not provide a bin of sufficient size to allow any waste that is not compostable to be collected?

I appreciate that some garden waste is best disposed of by burning to combat some plant diseases and pests. All I am asking is that these people show some consideration for others and conduct themselves in a neighbourly manner.

STEVE LYNE

Lowestoft

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