Bomb plotter jailed 'indefinitely'

A white supremacist arrested in Lowestoft on his way to striking his first blow in a war against the 'non-British" has today been jailed indefinitely.

A white supremacist arrested in Lowestoft on his way to striking his first blow in a war against the 'non-British' has today been jailed indefinitely.

Neo-Nazi Neil Lewington was found carrying home-made bombs after he was arrested by chance when the train he was travelling on arrived at Lowestoft station on October 30 last year. He was on his way to meet a woman he met on the internet and who lived in the town.

He was convicted of seven counts under the Terrorism Act and explosive laws in July.

He was today at the Old Bailey given an indeterminate sentence for public protection and told he must serve at least six years in jail after being convicted of having explosives with intent to endanger life and preparing for terrorism.


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During his trial at the Old Bailey, the court was told Neil Lewington was a loner who had been unemployed for 10 years after being sacked from his last job for being drunk. He had not spoken to his father for a decade and spent his time searching for girlfriends on chatlines and the internet.

It was this search which brought him to Lowestoft. When he was stopped and searched, he was travelling to meet divorcee Stephanie Alam, who lived in the town. He had exchanged messages with her in a chat room, claiming he was a 'fit and

athletic DJ'.

She told the court that in these messages he had spoken of his dislike of Asian people. He said he was a member of the National Front and wanted the Ku Klux Klan brought back.

Another woman, an Army cadet sergeant, said he asked if she had had dealings with the Nazi group Combat 18. She said he had an interest in chemicals and had taken some weedkiller from her.

Another girlfriend said he spoke of making bombs and asked at which house in her street an Asian family lived.

His defence counsel tried to play down his extremism. He was, they claimed, 'silly and immature' and had constructed a fantasy world to make up for his 'sad life'.

The reality was more chilling: he had ambitions of forming a racist hit squad along the lines of Hitler's Waffen SS.

Calling itself the Waffen SS UK, he envisaged teams working in twos to plant bombs all over Britain. It appeared Lowestoft may have been first on his list.

His plans were found in a handwritten manual called Waffen SS UK members' handbook, discovered in his bedroom.

After defining terrorism and the law, he set out his 'statement from the command council'. It said: 'A new group has been

formed, the Waffen SS UK. We have 30 members split into 15 two-man cells.

'We are highly trained ex-military personnel and will use incendiary and explosive devices throughout the UK at random until all non-British people as defined by blood are removed from our country. This is no joke.'

Brian Altman QC told the jury: 'You may conclude that this was a chilling mission statement, a statement of intention by this defendant, one he took very seriously and, quite clearly, an intention he had begun to put into effect.'

Counter-terrorism police found nothing to suggest the existence of a Waffen SS UK group following Lewington's arrest.

Lewington left school at 16 without qualifications but had worked in a number of electronics jobs. He had been unemployed for 10 years after being sacked from his last job for being drunk. He lived with his parents but had not spoken to his

father for 10 years.

Lewington had met a number of girlfriends he met over mobile phone chatlines, calling himself Aristocrat or Amadeus. He had made false claims to one internet girlfriend about being a Para during the Falklands War.

Lewington's parents described him as an alcoholic loner who had twice attempted suicide and would often drink 16 pints a day.

He had previously lived with a girl of Egyptian descent and another woman before coming back to live with his parents.

A source said: 'The SS handbook, this was something he was planning - or at the very least gives an insight into his mind.

'He was a nobody who thought this would make him a somebody.'

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