Search

Coins found in field could have belonged to Roman soldier

PUBLISHED: 15:00 26 February 2010 | UPDATED: 16:32 06 July 2010

Emily Dennis

A hoard of 208 coins found in a Suffolk field could have belonged to a retired Roman soldier.

The collection of silver denarii coins was discovered in an undisclosed area of north Suffolk last spring, an inquest heard.

A hoard of 208 coins found in a Suffolk field could have belonged to a retired Roman soldier.

The collection of silver denarii coins was discovered in an undisclosed area of north Suffolk last spring, an inquest heard.

Greater Suffolk Coroner Peter Dean determined the find to be treasure because of the age and silver composition of the coins.

Judith Plouviez, archaeological officer for the Conservation Team at Suffolk County Council, told the coroner that the coins covered a period between the 1st Century BC and the 1st Century AD of the Roman Empire.

She also explained that the collection of coins spanned across a number of Roman emperors, including Nero, Vespasian, Domitianus and Claudius.

Speaking after the inquest, Ms Plouviez said: “There have been a number of finds in the area due to the amount of people living and working here during that time.

“Due to the wealth of coins found in such a small patch, the owner must have been someone who was relatively well-to-do.

“It is very possible that the coins belonged to a retired soldier, as the Roman army was paid in silver coins.

“This is why so many coins can be found scattered around.”

A further inquest at Ipswich Magistrates' Court also revealed a gold Roman finger-ring to be treasure.

The ring was also found in a north Suffolk field.

All of the treasure will now be put forward to the Treasure Valuation Committee, organised independently by the British Museum, where the value of each lot will be established.

Most Read

Most Read

Latest from the Lowestoft Journal

Hot Jobs

Show Job Lists