Controversial anti-gull string cut down

A LANDOWNER has ordered a web of string put up to deter nuisance gulls to be cut down in a bid to not waste tax payers' money.Last month it was reported that Beccles Town Council had been stopped in its tracks in its efforts to rid a derelict factory site of the birds.

A LANDOWNER has ordered a web of string put up to deter nuisance gulls to be cut down in a bid to not waste tax payers' money.

Last month it was reported that Beccles Town Council had been stopped in its tracks in its efforts to rid a derelict factory site of the birds.

Neighbours from Gosford Road and Fair Close in Beccles who became fed up with the mess and noise caused by the colony, used bailing twine and wooden stakes to 'string up' the site to stop gulls from landing.

In a parallel effort, the council signed a �4,000 one-year contract to bring in a Harris Hawk, but after seeing the string the specialist firm refused to fly the bird on safety grounds.


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Resident Phillip Page, who spent days preparing the site along with fellow volunteers, said: 'I told them, if you want to take them down, take them down yourselves.

'From what I have heard from different people and farmers is that they don't think that the Harris Hawk will work so I'm tending to go with what they say, though I don't know.'

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He said: 'With regards to our stringing, there hasn't been a bird land since it's gone up.'

But he added: 'It's up to the council to spend tax-payers' money wisely. If it works I will be the first to congratulate them and I hope that they would do the same for me.'

Town clerk Bernie Broom said that on Friday the deputy mayor and a street cleaner removed the stakes and twine after being given permission to do so by landowner Anglia Co-op.

She said: 'Anglia Co-op told Mr Page that he had to remove the string because they didn't want the town council and therefore the residents of Beccles to be out of pocket as we had a legally binding contract.'

She added: 'We were working together in tandem to rid the area of the birds. It's just one of those unfortunate things that have happened.

'Anglia Co-Op have said they will reinstate the string themselves if the predator birds don't work.'

Mrs Broom said the bird would be re-introduced this week to fly several days a week, and that there was still time for the measure to work before the birds started to nest.

She added: 'They said it wasn't too late and that they can do an intensive programme. They have had success with other places.'

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