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Criminals' cash goes to good causes

PUBLISHED: 10:30 18 September 2009 | UPDATED: 14:00 06 July 2010

Ben Kendall

A shortlist of Norfolk community projects which could be funded using money confiscated from criminals has been revealed.

The Home Office's Community Cashback scheme aims to reinvest ill-gotten gains seized from convicted criminals into community initiatives which tackle anti-social or criminal behaviour.

A shortlist of Norfolk community projects which could be funded using money confiscated from criminals has been revealed.

The Home Office's Community Cashback scheme aims to reinvest ill-gotten gains seized from convicted criminals into community initiatives which tackle anti-social or criminal behaviour.

Members of the public were asked to nominate suitable schemes and the next stage asks members of the public to vote on which schemes deserve a share of the £95,000 allocated to Norfolk.

Andrew Baxter, Norfolk's chief crown prosecutor, said: “The CPS the police and the courts work closely together to recover cash and assets from convicted criminals and it seems only right that a proportion of these ill-gotten gains should be

used to pay for projects that help reduce crime and make communities safer.”

The nine Norfolk projects, spread across the county, vary from building new youth play areas and skate parks to schemes to prevent hate crime and protect young crime victims. The list of eligible schemes is:

School-based community play areas at Catton Grove Primary School, Norwich. The school already supports crime prevention in a high crime area by providing access to its facilities along with holiday clubs. There are few facilities for children and young people in the area and it hopes to use £16,750 to expand play facilities.

Yo!MAD Mobile at Dereham Recreation Ground works with young people tackling anti-social behaviour, petty crime, drugs, alcohol and relationships. The project began three years ago with an old bus providing a safe social area for youngsters. It now hopes to replace the bus with a new outreach vehicle. Some of the money would also cover running costs.

Heartsease Young People Engagement works with the Matthew Project drug and alcohol project to work positively with young people. It was formed after more than

1,000 antisocial behaviour incidents were recorded in the area

between 2007 and 2009. It hopes

to provide a Voicebox caravan

with positive role models in the

Sale Road Park area on Friday nights.

The Midnight Football project will covering give housing estates in the King's Lynn area. It would benefit the North Lynn, South Lynn, Fairstead, Gaywood and town centre areas. People aged 13 to 19 will take part in positive activities from 9pm to midnight. The scheme will target youngsters who currently hang around in streets, intimidating residents.

The Young People's Hate Crime Project would work across Norwich city centre in an attempt to reduce hate crime, including negative attitudes towards disability, ethnic minorities, religion, age, gender and sexuality. It would work with young people and run promotional campaigns.

Sheringham Skate Club works from all ages from seven upwards but mainly 13 to 23-year-olds. It is open every day, next to the Splash Leisure Centre, and aims to provide activities in an area which lacks good youth facilities. It hopes to develop an area for young people to meet in a safe environment, helping improve health and tackle nuisance behaviour.

Stairway to Safer Communities will recruit communities across the Broadland area to repair facilities damaged through criminal and anti-social behaviour. It will help bring people together and allow adults and children to understand one another. Mini projects will be set up in each of Broadland's seven safer neighbour-hood areas.

Family Intervention Projects provides intensive support to vulnerable families, focusing on families involved in persistent anti-social behaviour, and is now developing a scheme to reduce criminal behaviour by young

people who live in prolific

offending families. Two projects currently cover the Great Yarmouth area.

Being Young Is Not a Crime in a Yarmouth-based initiative which aims to highlight the fact that

young people are more likely to be victims of crime rather than offenders. The scheme will aim

to provide a centre in Yarmouth

for young victims to discuss the issues they face with trained volunteers.

To vote for your favourite visit cashback.cjsonline.gov.uk and

click on Norfolk. The deadline

for votes is next Friday. The popularity of each project will help judges decide how to share the money out.

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