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Developers defend plans for new homes

PUBLISHED: 09:42 29 January 2009 | UPDATED: 22:17 05 July 2010

DEVELOPERS hoping to build 20 homes near Lowestoft have told a planning inquiry that their proposals will not worsen flooding problems in the village.

Plans for 20 affordable homes to be built on land south of The Nordalls in Kessingland were turned down by Waveney District Council's development control committee in July.

DEVELOPERS hoping to build 20 homes near Lowestoft have told a planning inquiry that their proposals will not worsen flooding problems in the village.

Plans for 20 affordable homes to be built on land south of The Nordalls in Kessingland were turned down by Waveney District Council's development control committee in July.

Developer Wellington Construction announced in December that it was appealing against the decision and a local hearing in front of a government-appointed planning inspector was held in Lowestoft on Wednesday.

Villagers living near the proposed site, off Church Road, have had problems with flooding from both surface water and sewage overflow for several years.

John Peacock, on behalf of Wellington Construction, said that the applicants do not deny that there is a flooding problem in Kessingland, but do not believe that their proposed development would make the situation any worse.

The scheme was refused last year on the grounds that insufficient evidence had been provided into the effect that the development might have on flooding, but Mr Peacock said that a flood risk assessment did not need to be carried out because the site is smaller than one hectare.

He said that Anglian Water did not raise any objection to the plans. “We have proved we can accommodate what will be produced in terms of surface water and foul sewage but it has nothing to do with the on-going problem of flooding in the village,” he said.

Waveney's principal planning officer Phil Perkin said: “The main concern that the council has is that there are incidents of flooding within the locality of the appeal site, and it is something that goes back many, many years. That really is the basis of the council's case in this appeal.”

Liam Martin, chairman of Kessingland Parish Council, said: “The existing foul water system cannot cope during times of heavy rain, and residents are frequently subject to incidents of flooding.”

He added: “Allowing this development to go ahead will only exacerbate an already serious situation.”

Planning inspector John Felgate, appointed by the department of communities and local government, will make a decision on the plans later in the spring.


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