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Disease kills holidaymaker

PUBLISHED: 13:15 18 April 2008 | UPDATED: 20:10 05 July 2010

A SUFFOLK man has died after visiting a Scottish resort where the Legionella bacteria has been found, it emerged last night.

Part of the Scottish leisure resort, near Dundee, was closed yesterday after the bacteria which causes the potentially deadly Legionnaires' disease was found on the site.

A SUFFOLK man has died after visiting a Scottish resort where the Legionella bacteria has been found, it emerged last night.

Part of the Scottish leisure resort, near Dundee, was closed yesterday after the bacteria which causes the potentially deadly Legionnaires' disease was found on the site.

An investigation was launched after a 60-year-old Suffolk man, who had recently visited Piperdam resort in Angus, died of the disease on Friday at the James Paget Hospital, Gorleston.

Health officials have now found Legionella bacteria in a shower head and a hot tub at one of the lodges in the resort.

The owners of Piperdam have voluntarily closed their holiday lodges, swimming and spa facilities and are working closely with investigating environmental health officers.

NHS Tayside Health Protection is contacting people who stayed at the resort between 2 and 15 April as well as those who used the shower facilities on site.

Piperdam said the park would remain closed until there was no further risk to guests.

Owner Phil Mulholland said: "The health and safety of our guests is of paramount importance at all times.

"As soon as we were aware of the potential presence of the disease we notified our customers of the risk and closed the park.

"We are co-operating fully with NHS Tayside Health Protection and Angus Council Environmental Health Team in their ongoing investigation.

"Our thoughts and sympathies are with the family at this sad time."

The golf resort, gym, restaurant and bar and fishing facilities remained open.

Symptoms of Legionnaires' disease include high fever with sweating, severe headache, shortness of breath, pain in the side of the chest, and muscle aches.

It is caught by inhaling infected water droplets, and the incubation period for the disease ranges from two to 10 days.

Anyone who visited the resort between 2 and 15 April and then becomes ill with any of the symptoms of the disease was urged to contact their GP.

NHS Tayside Health Protection team, Angus Council Environmental Health team and Health Protection Scotland are continuing their investigations.

In February a man died from Legionnaires' disease at Crosshouse Hospital in Kilmarnock, Ayrshire.

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