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Family says thanks for saving a life

PUBLISHED: 10:14 14 August 2008 | UPDATED: 21:03 05 July 2010

A MAN who suffered life-threatening injuries in a motorcycle crash between Lowestoft and Southwold says he owes his life to the air ambulance service.

Ritchie Goodrum, 32, spoke about the crash that left him fighting for his life at the side of a road and now his sister will be cycling 130 miles from Nottinghamshire to Norfolk in just one day to raise money for the East Anglian Air Ambulance, which flew her brother to hospital.

A MAN who suffered life-threatening injuries in a motorcycle crash between Lowestoft and Southwold says he owes his life to the air ambulance service.

Ritchie Goodrum, 32, spoke about the crash that left him fighting for his life at the side of a road and now his sister will be cycling 130 miles from Nottinghamshire to Norfolk in just one day to raise money for the East Anglian Air Ambulance, which flew her brother to hospital.

Mr Goodrum, who lives with his partner in Gorleston, collided with a people carrier in South Cove on May 10 earlier this year.

At first it was thought that he had just broken his leg, but he had also broken his pelvis in two places and was bleeding internally.

Once his condition was stabilised, the air ambulance was able to take him to the Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital in just seven minutes and he received urgent medical attention.

Mr Goodrum said: “I was riding near South Cove. It was a beautiful day and I was going round the bend near the church. The front end of the bike started to slide away and I tried to correct it, but then I started seeing bushes, road and sky.

"The road ambulance was there within five minutes and the air ambulance not far behind. I was given anaesthetic and was at the roadside for an hour because my heart was unstable.

"It went from me having a broken leg to the paramedics not being able to work out what was going on. I was bleeding internally and lost two and a half pints of blood."

Mr Goodrum, who worked as a relief lorry driver before the crash is still in recovery and currently needs a wheelchair. Just three weeks before the accident, the company he worked for had chosen to make a donation to the air ambulance, which is a charity that does not receive government funding.

"I can't do enough for the air ambulance and have always been a supporter. They are lifesavers and I have no doubt that if it wasn't for them I wouldn't be talking about it today," said Mr Goodrum.

He added that support from his friends and family had been vitally important during his recovery and his sister, Emily Holmes, who now lives in Nottinghamshire, is set to cycle with her husband from Newark-on-Trent to her home town of Gorleston on September 7.

Mrs Holmes, 28, has been training weekly for the challenge and the couple have already raised £700 in sponsorship.

"We are aiming to do the ride in 12 hours," she said. "The air ambulance is such an important resource that everyone takes for granted. Without them my brother would have died."

If you would like to make a donation online, visit www.justgiving/deanholmes


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