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Fitting feature for most easterly point?

PUBLISHED: 13:48 05 September 2008 | UPDATED: 21:13 05 July 2010

ATTRACTION: Sculptor Robert Simon with a model of his monument to celebrate Ness Point.

ATTRACTION: Sculptor Robert Simon with a model of his monument to celebrate Ness Point.

SUPPORT for the campaign to improve Ness Point at Lowestoft and use its significance as the most easterly point of the UK as a major tourist attraction continues to grow.

NEW FEATURE: The suggested monument.

SUPPORT for the campaign to improve Ness Point at Lowestoft and use its significance as the most easterly point of the UK as a major tourist attraction continues to grow.

Last week the Journal joined forces with BBC Radio Suffolk to highlight the area and improve both its appearance and signs directing visitors to the geographical landmark.

One of the main criticisms is that there is no monument or other feature at Ness Point where people can be photographed with to show they have reached the eastern-most outpost of the United Kingdom mainland.

However, a Suffolk artist has come up with his own idea on the sort of monument needed to rectify this.

Robert Simon, 82, of Woodbridge, believes the area deserves to have a proper monument.

The sculptor and painter had his own studio and workshop at Stratford St Andrew, near Saxmundham, for many years where he designed and made his impressive structures which are still prominent features in gardens and parks across East Anglia and further afield.

These days Mr Simon restricts himself to coming up with designs and making miniature models before entrusting other craftsmen to make the full-size works of art.

His design for Ness Point is sure to appeal to people of all ages.

“As it is to be placed at the UK's most easterly point it is important that the structure reflects the sun's rays as it rises. The short pieces in the work will capture the sun's rays first and as the sun rises so the rest of the structure will be bathed in sunlight,” he said.

The work, which would be about 9ft high and made of stainless steel, is also designed so that people can be photographed in front of it, behind it or even through it.

“When I heard there was no structure at Ness Point I immediately got to work to come up with an idea and hopefully spark interest in the project,” he said.

Further support for Ness Point came from the RSPB's Ian Barthorpe, who is based at the Minsmere reserve, near Dunwich.

Mr Barthorpe said Ness Point is known as a good spot to see wading birds and other species by birdwatchers, particularly in the winter months.

He would like to see the area improved and certainly have better signposting so that visitors have an easier task in reaching the landmark.

Cecilia Coward, of Tonning Street, Lowestoft, is among those who believes re-naming the approach road to Ness Point would be a good idea.

At present the area is reached along Gas Works Road but Mrs Coward thinks it should be re-named Sunrise Lane as there is already an Eastern Way in Lowestoft.

We want to hear your views on how Ness Point can be celebrated as the UK's most easterly point. Write to: The Editor, Lowestoft Journal, 147 London Road North, Lowestoft NR32 1NB or e-mail russell.cook@archant.co.uk

Go to Radio Suffolk's website to see more pictures of the campaign launch at www.bbc.co.uk/Suffolk/in_pictures/

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