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Fly-tipper admits dumping household waste he had been paid to remove

PUBLISHED: 09:59 11 April 2019 | UPDATED: 13:18 11 April 2019

Fly-tipped waste at Woods Lane in Camps Heath dumped by Andrew Jones. PHOTO: East Suffolk Council

Fly-tipped waste at Woods Lane in Camps Heath dumped by Andrew Jones. PHOTO: East Suffolk Council

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A fly-tipper dumped household waste he had been paid £60 to remove.

Fly-tipped waste at Woods Lane in Camps Heath dumped by Andrew Jones. PHOTO: East Suffolk CouncilFly-tipped waste at Woods Lane in Camps Heath dumped by Andrew Jones. PHOTO: East Suffolk Council

Andrew Jones, of Newsons Meadow, Lowestoft, appeared at Great Yarmouth Magistrates’ Court on Tuesday, April 9, accused of two counts of depositing controlled waste without an environmental permit, as well as one charge of failing to provide information.

On April 4, 2018, a large quantity of waste, including furniture, cardboard boxes, clothing and personal effects, was dumped on public land at Wood Lane in Camps Heath.

On April 9, 2018, more waste, mainly black sacks, furniture, and plastic and cardboard boxes, were dumped on private land at Border Lane, Ashby.

Officers from Waveney Norse, now East Suffolk Norse, investigated the sites and found letters addressed to properties in Lowestoft and Gorleston.

Fly-tipped waste dumped by Andrew Jones. PHOTO: East Suffolk CouncilFly-tipped waste dumped by Andrew Jones. PHOTO: East Suffolk Council

When interviewed, the householders named Jones as the person paid to remove the waste from their shed and garden.

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The 34-year-old admitted visiting the Lowestoft property three times to remove waste, but claimed he had taken two trips to the Household Waste Recycling Centre and, after his third visit to the house, let a friend borrow his van.

Jones claimed his friend must have fly-tipped the rubbish without his knowledge, but refused to provide their name. Officers charged Jones with failing to provide information to the council on August 23.

Jones, who pleaded guilty to the three charges, was ordered by magistrates to carry out 160 hours of unpaid work, as well as paying £379 in compensation to the Somerleyton Estate and £400 to East Suffolk Council for the cost of removing the waste from both locations.

He was also ordered to pay a £700 contribution to the council’s legal costs.

Phil Gore, head of environmental services and port health at East Suffolk Council, said: “There is no excuse for fly-tipping in our beautiful countryside and we will always take action to find those responsible for incidents such as these.

“While we would have preferred a stronger penalty reflective of the large amount of waste dumped, we are pleased that Mr Jones has been held accountable for his actions.

“Householders also have a ‘duty of care’ to ensure their waste is disposed of properly and to retain details of anyone taking waste from their property on their behalf.”

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