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Food poisoning investigation at pub

PUBLISHED: 10:46 20 August 2010 | UPDATED: 09:49 16 September 2010

A POPULAR seaside restaurant and pub has been investigated by environmental health officers after 21 customers suffered from food poisoning.

The Jolly Sailors at Pakefield is still being monitored by Waveney District Council after reports that people suffered diarrhoea and abdominal cramps after visiting the restaurant at the beginning of August.

A POPULAR seaside restaurant and pub has been investigated by environmental health officers after 21 customers suffered from food poisoning.

The Jolly Sailors at Pakefield is still being monitored by Waveney District Council after reports that people suffered diarrhoea and abdominal cramps after visiting the restaurant at the beginning of August.

But last night landlord Phil Mahoney insisted there was no conclusive evidence of what had caused the sickness.

Environmental health officers from Waveney District Council, alongside the Health Protection Agency's Norfolk, Suffolk and Cambridgeshire Health Protection Unit worked together to investigate the reports.

A council spokesman said they took immediate action and, with the full co-operation of the restaurant, food service was voluntarily stopped for five days while “matters of concern” were addressed.

All those affected recovered at their homes within 48 hours and no further illnesses were reported.

The business resumed serving food on August 6 after the staff undertook “a great deal of work to achieve high standards of hygiene and to address problems,” the spokesman said.

Last night, Mr Mahoney said: “They took bacterial swabs of everything and there was no conclusive proof of what had caused it. It could have been an airborne virus.”

Tony Burgess, the council's principal environmental health officer, said: “Waveney District Council has a graduated enforcement policy and this will be reflected in any action taken against the premises.

“Account will be taken of its past history, the recent high level of co-operation and, crucially, the need to ensure no possibility of recurrence.

“There will be ongoing discussions and correspondence with the proprietors and management at the premises regarding this matter, and the need to ensure compliance in the future.”


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