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Holiday's end, but safety's still tops

PUBLISHED: 14:15 29 August 2008 | UPDATED: 21:10 05 July 2010

The lifeguard team have worked tirelessly to keep the beaches safe this summer

The lifeguard team have worked tirelessly to keep the beaches safe this summer

AS weather forecasters predict a warm weekend, beaches in the Waveney area are sure to see be busy once again as friends and families descend on the sands for a day in the sun.

AS weather forecasters predict a warm weekend, beaches in the Waveney area are sure to see be busy once again as friends and families descend on the sands for a day in the sun.

While it's great to have fun on the sand and in the sea, there is some important information and advice that you must remember to keep safe, and each week The Journal and Waveney District Council has been teaming up to keep everyone Beach Safe this summer.

This is the final week of the Stay Safe This Summer campaign, but while this signals the end of the drive, the important messages conveyed over the past two months remain true. Keep sight of young children at all times, ask a lifeguard for advice, do not swim near groynes and piers, and if you get into trouble in the water, raise your hand in the air and shout for help.

Councillor Stephen Ardley, portfolio holder for health and wellbeing, launched the campaign at the start of the summer, and now signs off another busy season for Waveney District Council's beach lifeguard team.

“The weather this summer has been very unpredictable. We've seen some very hot and sunny days, especially around the air festival, but have also had some very wet and overcast days,” he said.

“Regardless of the ever-changeable weather, the lifeguards have remained vigilant on our beaches and proved their worth on numerous occasions. The beach lifeguard team are totally dedicated to keeping our beaches safe and with visitor figures nearing one million they have certainly had their work cut out.

“The team has undertaken some formidable rescues this season in very difficult conditions, often understating their efforts but actually doing nothing short of saving people's lives. Events unfolding in this way simply underline the need for this professional service on our beaches in order to keep those that use them safe.”

Mr Ardley added: “I hope that the team's weekly updates in The Journal have enabled people to safely enjoy their visits to the beach and helped them to understand the meanings of our warning flags and some of the dangers associated with the sea.”


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