Search

Hospital example of fighting killer bug

PUBLISHED: 17:37 23 September 2008 | UPDATED: 21:20 05 July 2010

THE Norfolk hospital at the centre of outbreak of a killer bug has now become a shining example to other health sites across the country on how to combat deadly infections.

THE Norfolk hospital at the centre of outbreak of a killer bug has now become a shining example to other health sites across the country on how to combat deadly infections.

Last year 18 people at the James Paget University Hospital, in Gorleston, died following complications involving clostridium difficile.

And now more than 12 months after a major clean up campaign at the JPH, the efforts in ridding wards of Cdiff cases will be shared among every hospital and care trust in Britain.

From next Tuesday hospitals will receive a booklet entitled “Clostridium difficile - The experience of one acute hospital in dealing with rising levels of Cdiff and an outbreak of the strain.”

And the news that the JPH trust is a leading light of how to combat infectious disease follows on from a successful report showing that the hospital has met 13 out of 14 government health targets.

Its AGM report says that in 2007/8 there were 138 cases of cdiff in the hospital trust - 262 lower than NHS aims.

At the height of the four month 2007 outbreak 39 new cases of the bug were reported every month.

The booklet shows how the JPH dramatically reduced Cdiff cases by deep cleaning wards, reducing hospital bays, installing cleaning gel dispensers, isolating patients and making sure staff changed their uniforms every day.

Nick Coveney, JPH director of nursing and patient services, said: “The outbreak had a profound effect on the hospital, as well as the patients, and resulted in some significant changes in the way the hospital approaches the management of Cdiff.

“The purpose of the document is to share the learning from the JPH experience and highlight how it is possible to deliver on other performance targets while rapidly reducing the levels of Cdiff to among some of the lowest in the country.”

On Monday night the JPH released its annual report for 2007/8 which showed waiting times, A&E and cancer responses and access to genito-urinary clinics beat all government targets.

The JPH trust also showed financial prudence by ending up with a healthy budget surplus of £2.1m

Chairman John Hemming said: “We can say very clearly that 2007/8 has been yet another year of very substantial achievement.

“We have got a pretty good range of dedicated staff here and it is only on the back of them and the good work that they do that we are a successful organisation.”

The only negative comment in the 2007/8 report was the number of diagnosed MRSA cases in the local health care system - 22 which was 10 above government expectations.

Most Read

Most Read

Latest from the Lowestoft Journal

Hot Jobs

Show Job Lists