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Lowestoft lifeboat called to aid two vessels in difficulties

PUBLISHED: 14:59 31 July 2015 | UPDATED: 17:01 07 August 2015

Lowestoft's RNLI lifeboat, Patsy Knight, towing in the yacht. Pictures: MIKE BEADLE/RNLI LOWESTOFT.

Lowestoft's RNLI lifeboat, Patsy Knight, towing in the yacht. Pictures: MIKE BEADLE/RNLI LOWESTOFT.

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There was an “unusual” double call out for Lowestoft’s RNLI lifeboat yesterday (Thursday, July 30) when two boats called for assistance – one after the other.

The view from Lowestoft's RNLI lifeboat Patsy Knight, as the CEFAS Endeavour recovers their rescue craft, which they launched to help them place a tow on the yacht. Pictures: MIKE BEADLE/RNLI LOWESTOFT LIFEBOATThe view from Lowestoft's RNLI lifeboat Patsy Knight, as the CEFAS Endeavour recovers their rescue craft, which they launched to help them place a tow on the yacht. Pictures: MIKE BEADLE/RNLI LOWESTOFT LIFEBOAT

A yacht and a motor cruiser both broke down separately, and in different positions, and needed help from the port’s Shannon-class all-weather lifeboat Patsy Knight.

Lowestoft lifeboat coxswain John Fox said: “We were initially tasked to a motor cruiser that had broken down off Kessingland, which was being helped by the crew of the CEFAS Endeavour. But as we were leaving the harbour entrance we were redirected by Humber coastguard to a yacht that was in trouble north of Corton.”

The lifeboat headed to the first stranded vessel, which was a yacht named Ballad that had one person on board, and had got into difficulties four miles north of Lowestoft, suffering engine failure.

Mr Fox said: “Our crew soon attached a tow line and brought the craft into Lowestoft. We then went straight out to sea again and headed to Kessingland.

“The CEFAS Endeavour crew had already put a crewman on board the stranded 10-metre British motor cruiser named Lanpuki, to help the three people on board to restart it’s failed engine – but without success.”

The CEFAS Endeavour then connected a tow line and were in the Stamford Channel near the north Newcombe buoy when Lowestoft lifeboat “rendezvoused with them” and took over the tow, bringing the cruiser into the yacht club mooring at Lowestoft.

A lifeboat spokesman said: “It is unusual to have two vessels needing help at the same time. We can go for a few weeks in the winter without a call out but the volunteer crew continue to train all year round and are ready to respond to a call whenever their pagers sound an alert signal.”

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