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Lowestoft: Man injured 16 years ago dies

PUBLISHED: 10:44 01 April 2009 | UPDATED: 08:40 06 July 2010

A CHEF who needed round the clock care after suffering severe injuries in an accident 16 years ago died because of long-term complications with his condition, a coroner has said.

A CHEF who needed round the clock care after suffering severe injuries in an accident 16 years ago died because of long-term complications with his condition, a coroner has said.

William Da Costa was cycling along Bloodmoor Road, in Lowestoft, when the original collision happened in 1992.

The 40-year-old was making his way home from work on October 28 when it is believed a gust of wind caught the rear door of a lorry that was parked at the side of the road.

The door hit Mr Da Costa and he was thrown from his bike into the path of an oncoming car.

He was taken to Addenbrooke's Hospital, in Cambridge, and underwent lifesaving surgery, but because of the injuries to his head doctors thought he would only live for another nine years.

The accident left Mr Da Costa severely disabled and he had been receiving round the clock care at the Sue Ryder Care Home, Chantry Park, in Hadleigh Road, Ipswich.

He died on March 10 this year after being admitted to Ipswich Hospital with a renal tract infection.

At the inquest into his death held yesterday (March 31), Greater Suffolk Coroner Dr Peter Dean said his condition had been deteriorating for some time.

He said that when he was admitted to hospital he was found to have severe septicaemia and a renal tract infection, but failed to respond to specialised treatment.

Recording a narrative verdict, Dr Dean said the death was from long-term complications following a road traffic accident.

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