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Meeting could resolve power problem

PUBLISHED: 12:44 26 January 2009 | UPDATED: 22:16 05 July 2010

FISHERMEN who have been struggling for years to work at a harbour with no electricity supply could soon see their problem resolved.

The few remaining fishermen who work out of Southwold harbour have no access to electricity in their sheds - meaning they cannot have lights or refrigerators to store their bait and catch.

FISHERMEN who have been struggling for years to work at a harbour with no electricity supply could soon see their problem resolved.

The few remaining fishermen who work out of Southwold harbour have no access to electricity in their sheds - meaning they cannot have lights or refrigerators to store their bait and catch.

Along with other traders who work in the harbour - which is home to many businesses and is an important tourist attraction - they have been asking for years to have the sheds connected on to the supply.

Now harbour users and officers from Waveney District Council are to meet to see if a solution can be found.

Graham Hay Davison, chairman of the Southwold Harbour and River Blyth Users' Association, said: “The issue was raised some time ago and formed part of our bid for EU funding two years ago.

“Unfortunately we were not awarded any funds on that occasion but the need remains and, during these dark days, fishermen's use of their sheds is curtailed by the lack of daylight. And in the summer, while there is plenty of daylight, the summer temperatures require the use of refrigeration to meet environmental health requirements.

“As harbour users, our aim is to persuade Waveney District Council to provide the necessary facilities to enable ishermen

and other harbour traders to grow their businesses and succeed.”

Southwold was once a prosperous fishing port. It is estimated that in 1839 there were 192 boats sailing regularly out of the harbour, catching herrings, sprats and shrimps, as well as sole and cod for the London markets.

The industry slowly declined and today fewer than half a dozen fishing boats regularly use the harbour.

A spokesman for Waveney District Council said: “We will do our best to accommodate their needs.”


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