Search

Mobility scooters

PUBLISHED: 13:29 14 July 2008 | UPDATED: 23:04 18 July 2011

WITH regard to the letter by Mr G A Woods (July 4), referring to the elderly who use motorised buggies; users have to meet an eyesight requirement by law.

WITH regard to the letter by Mr G A Woods (July 4), referring to the elderly who use motorised buggies; users have to meet an eyesight requirement by law.

In some cases there may be people using mobility scooters for some time whose eyesight has deteriorated since purchasing the scooter, and either do not realise this or, like some car drivers, do nothing about it as they wish to retain their independence for as long as possible.

From another perspective, when you have ridden a mobility scooter, a wheelchair, or even pushed a child in a baby buggie, you (or the child's buggie) are below a pedestrian's eye level and people often walk in front of you without realising you are there.

I am not saying it's the pedestrians fault but all pavement users should be aware of, and be tolerant, to each other.

It is legal for a mobility scooter to be on the pavement, whereas for a bicycle it is not. Bicycles can be ridden as quick as the rider can pedal, pavement mobility scooters have a regulated top speed of 4mph.

DAVID SMITH

Beactive Mobility

Bevan Street

Lowestoft


If you value what this story gives you, please consider supporting the Lowestoft Journal. Click the link in the orange box above for details.

Most Read

Become a supporter

This newspaper has been a central part of community life for many years. Our industry faces testing times, which is why we're asking for your support. Every contribution will help us continue to produce local journalism that makes a measurable difference to our community.

Most Read

Latest from the Lowestoft Journal