More memories of a fashion craze

BACK in August 2007, Turning Back the Clock helped to launch a new project for London-based artist Peter Wylie.Mr Wylie was appealing for people with memories of the town's 1950s and 60s party culture.

BACK in August 2007, Turning Back the Clock helped to launch a new project for London-based artist Peter Wylie.

Mr Wylie was appealing for people with memories of the town's 1950s and 60s party culture. Numerous people came forward with memories and photographs as many former trawler men remembered their colourful fisherboy suits that helped to light up the town's nightlife.

The story went on to reach a national audience as Mr Wylie featured on BBC Radio Four programme Making History in May 2008. Through this Chris Breward, head of research at the Victoria and Albert Museum, claimed that the town's style of red, blue, lime green and tartan suits was quite unique for the country.

Last month the story continued as a group of the town's The Dockside Dandies gathered together in Lowestoft High Street to mark the closing of Lawrence Green tailors, one of the shops who made the bright suits in the 1960s.


You may also want to watch:


Norman Russell, of Hopton, saw this and contacted us to recall his memories of the fashion craze that he remembered from the 1950s.

'What I recall is all of the lads of my generation in the early 50s wearing brightly multi-coloured suits. At least 75pc were full drape double breasted, with 32in bottoms, usually with white socks, thick crepe soled shoes, open necked shirts, shirt collar pulled out and white t-shirts,' he said.

Most Read

Mr Russell's own collection included black pinstripe, pale blue and brown-striped suits.

'I think the last one I bought was in December 1956 to go to the Palias Christmas Eve dance,' he said.

Throughout the first half of the 1950s, Mr Russell and his friends Peter Langdale, Eric Gook, Ernie Peck, John Peek, Mickey and Paul Reader, Lardy Howe, Mickey Whittingstool and Alfie Hitter, enjoyed their weekends off the fishing boats as they made the most of the town's nightlife. But by 1956 they would leave their bright suits behind as they started to settle down, and the next generation of Dockside Dandies stepped forward to continue the craze.

Peter Wylie continues to work on his arts project about the fisherboys and their suits, and is hoping to involve local schools and art students. Anyone with memories about the fashion can share them with Peter on 0208 9801 120 or email eastofwylie@yahoo.com

Become a Supporter

This newspaper has been a central part of community life for many years. Our industry faces testing times, which is why we're asking for your support. Every contribution will help us continue to produce local journalism that makes a measurable difference to our community.

Become a Supporter
Comments powered by Disqus