Search

‘Music is a fantastic therapy’ - Man opens three clubs for people with dementia

PUBLISHED: 14:42 21 December 2019 | UPDATED: 14:46 21 December 2019

A support worker is launching three brand new sound-based support groups for people with dementia and learning difficulties. Picture: DENISE BRADLEY

A support worker is launching three brand new sound-based support groups for people with dementia and learning difficulties. Picture: DENISE BRADLEY

Archant

A support worker is launching three brand new sound-based support groups for people with dementia and learning difficulties.

Music can vastly improve the ability of people with dementia to recall memories, speak and move.

Tim Boardman, a cashier at Morrisons, is launching three new clubs after more than 65 years of supporting people with needs.

"Music is a fantastic alternative therapy to those that receive day to day from specialist service providers and could assist them," he said.

"So I'm starting a music club for people with dementia and other memory problems including head injuries, and learning difficulties, with their carers, family and friends."

Mr Boardman closed two of his last clubs, which had ran weekly for three years.

"I was devastated but so passionate about music that I am not going to give up," he said.

You may also want to watch:

"Instead of just providing music to the general public, I need to provide it to those people who are genuine music lovers, [who] enjoy it, appreciate it, need it, and who will benefit."

Having previously worked in social care and support work, Mr Broadman said he wanted to put his skills back to good use.

Starting on Friday, January 17, the "I Remember When" music club will run at the Carlton Colville community centre. It will be held on the third Friday of every month from 10.30am to 1.30pm and cost £5 for admission to support the club.

From 7pm until 11pm, the club will offer 'music respite therapy' for anyone who supports those with memory problems or a disability.

He is also launching a third monthly club at Morrisons in Pakefield, for everyone to enjoy music 50s to 80s music.

READ MORE: 'This is all for them' - How a theatre is helping people with dementia to speak



Mr Broadman was inspired by the Seagull theatre, who are supporting those with dementia across Norfolk and Suffolk through free arts and activities.

"Between us both we would be offering twice the amount of support, events, and services to those that need it most," he said.

He added he is keen to work with anyone who wants to become a part of the projects, and those interested should get in touch.


If you value what this story gives you, please consider supporting the Lowestoft Journal. Click the link in the yellow box below for details.

Become a supporter

This newspaper has been a central part of community life for many years, through good times and bad, serving as your advocate and trusted source of local information. Our industry is facing testing times, which is why I’m asking for your support. Every single contribution will help us continue to produce award-winning local journalism that makes a measurable difference to our community.

Thank you.

Most Read

Most Read

Latest from the Lowestoft Journal