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Lowestoft charity appeals for unwanted musical instruments for new project to help vulnerable people

PUBLISHED: 09:41 24 November 2017 | UPDATED: 09:41 24 November 2017

Rikki, who is turning his life around with the help of Access Community Trust, and has started volunteering at Take Note Music in Lowestoft. Picture: Lee Johnson.

Rikki, who is turning his life around with the help of Access Community Trust, and has started volunteering at Take Note Music in Lowestoft. Picture: Lee Johnson.

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Rikki, who is turning his life around with the help of Access Community Trust, and has started volunteering at Take Note Music in Lowestoft. Picture: Lee Johnson. 
Rikki, who is turning his life around with the help of Access Community Trust, and has started volunteering at Take Note Music in Lowestoft. Picture: Lee Johnson.

A charity supporting vulnerable people in Lowestoft is appealing for donations of unwanted musical instruments to bring music back into their lives.

Access Community Trust helps people overcome barriers to living independently such as mental health issues, lack of training and education and integrates socially excluded people back into society.

And the trust has launched a new project to put music on its programme and help people build their self-confidence while learning new skills.

Lee Johnson, arts and culture education coordinator from Access Community Trust said: “Our customers come from all walks of life and Access is helping those that is finding it sometimes hard to socialise for one reason or another.

“The “Music To Our Ears” project will bring people together to learn new skills and develop any hidden talents they have. Everyone loves music and music evokes such emotion from your first dance at your wedding or when your first child was born.

“The project will help to break down any barriers, help people with poor mental health and will develop skills and abilities and build confidence.”

It will help people like 22-year-old music-lover Rikki, who lives at Phoenix House - one of Access Community Trust’s Housing Related Support Projects, after a period of homelessness, drug addiction and crime. He is now turning his life around with the help of Access Community Trust and has started volunteering at Take Note Music in Grove Road.

He said: “I started playing the guitar when I was about six-years-old. When I’m in a bad mood, picking up a guitar makes me happy. It’s really good for my mental health because it just clears my mind and helps me to forget things. I really enjoy playing and being creative. I think everyone should have access to music and be able to learn an instrument, it’s good for the soul.”

Mr Johnson hopes the generosity of local people donating unwanted instruments will help them get the programme up and running.

He said: “I know children can quickly grow out of musical instruments and they end up in the back of a cupboard or somewhere, and we would love use of them to help transform the lives of some very vulnerable people in our community.”

Anyone who has an instrument to donate can take it into The Workspace at 114 High Street, Sams Café in Bevan Street East or Take Note Music Company, 11 Grove Road, all in Lowestoft.

If you have an especially large instrument and need help donating, call Mr Johnson on 07388992923 or email lee.johnson@accessct.org


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