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New era in wildlife conservation

PUBLISHED: 12:01 07 October 2008 | UPDATED: 21:26 05 July 2010

The director of Suffolk Wildlife Trust will travel to Westminster today to celebrate a milestone in animal and landscape conservation.

Julian Roughton is to meet MPs and leading environmentalists to mark the launch of the nationwide Living Landscape scheme, which will cover more than one million hectares of protected land.

The director of Suffolk Wildlife Trust will travel to Westminster today to celebrate a milestone in animal and landscape conservation.

Julian Roughton is to meet MPs and leading environmentalists to mark the launch of the nationwide Living Landscape scheme, which will cover more than one million hectares of protected land.

The UK's 47 Wildlife Trusts, which operate more than 2,200 nature reserves, are joining up to promote the project, which will see the focus of conservation broadened from protecting individual reserves to considering the landscape as a whole.

The trusts will work closely with landowners, government agencies, planners and politicians to implement the scheme to help wildlife adapt to climate change.

Mr Roughton, who will be talking to local MPs today, said the effects of climate change would see many plants and animals needing to move in search of suitable conditions.

He said: “This is the future of conservation. We have spent many years safeguarding wildlife havens. Now we must expand on these and create a 'Living Landscape' where our nature reserves are integral parts of wider functioning landscapes and not isolated oases.

“In Suffolk this work is already under way and today we are celebrating the first steps of success.

“There is much to do but these large-scale schemes will help to alleviate floods, control pollution and help us cope with extremes of temperature.”

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