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No reaction to superbugs concern

PUBLISHED: 12:03 28 January 2008 | UPDATED: 19:33 05 July 2010

THE December 14 issue of The Journal contained an article by a very well informed young woman who is rightly concerned about deadly superbugs.

I have been expecting to read some reaction but to my surprise there has been none.

THE December 14 issue of The Journal contained an article by a very well informed young woman who is rightly concerned about deadly superbugs.

I have been expecting to read some reaction but to my surprise there has been none.

Many of us know people who have gone into hospital for a minor procedure and who have been infected with MRSA or Clostridium Difficile (C-Diff).

I have been listening to programmes where comments have been made about infection risk from surfaces, hand rails and handles, where it is said that there is no protection once the surface is dry.

I have enquired about this and been told that the standard government procedure to clean hospitals is to use detergent and a hypochlorite (bleach) solution.

The trouble is, while infection levels have stabilised, there are still people suffering and hypochlorite breaks down in the presence of dirt. Also C-Diff forms spores in a defence reaction to detergents commonly used and bleach takes a long time to kill the spores.

As the hypochlorite is rinsed off immediately as bleach cannot be left on is it probable that C-Diff spores are left behind?

There is, as Eva George rightly said in her article, a new type of cleaning product available STERI-7 which is currently being used in hospitals in Ireland that actually kills C-Diff in five minutes which does not have to be rinsed off and which remains on the cleaned surface for seven days and is reactivated by moisture.

Why is the product not in general use?

DAWN WEST

Kensington Court

London Road South

Lowestoft

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