Novel ideas to cut police costs

GIVING detainees cheap bread and jam instead of meals and selling the koi carp in the moat at force headquarters' were among cost-cutting suggestions in a Suffolk police survey.

GIVING detainees cheap bread and jam instead of meals and selling the koi carp in the moat at force headquarters' were among cost-cutting suggestions in a Suffolk police survey.

Officers and civilian staff were asked to make suggestions that could help the cash-strapped force slash millions of pounds from its budget.

A force-wide e-mail requesting ideas prompted nearly 300 replies, offering a wide variety of money-saving options.

Many concentrated on energy savings, reducing police helicopter costs, cutting overtime and shopping around for the best deals on purchases. However, among the more drastic suggestions was to get rid of all the police community support officers.


You may also want to watch:


Senior officers were also urged to sell off the Giles picture in the police bar, improve paper towel holders, review the use of taxis for detainees, ban biscuits, buffets and tea from meetings, and stop hiring pot plants.

Someone even recommended filling in the moat at Martlesham HQ after the koi carp it contained were sold off, while another person believed staff should bring their own pens and pencils to work.

Most Read

Lucy Sheehan, force spokesman, said: 'Suffolk Police Authority and Suffolk Constabulary value the opinions and input of their officers and staff in relation to all aspects of the policing of the county.

'The constabulary is currently experiencing a time of change as it faces increasing demands to realise financial savings.

'This has a significant effect on all staff and their co-operation and involvement is crucial in allowing us to manage the changes necessary to deliver these savings whilst ensuring an efficient and effective police service across the county.

'The chief constable contacted all staff in December 2009 in response to the tightening financial context, asking for all to consider suggestions they may have for efficiencies across the force.

'A total of 296 suggestions were received, covering a wide range of localised and countywide issues, and these suggestions are being considered at the police authority's human resources and staff liaison committee.

'The police authority and the chief officer team will be making decisions on the suggestions made, as to whether they can be progressed, will not be pursued further or whether the suggestions merit further investigation.

'The police authority is committed to ensuring that the views and the welfare of staff are taken into consideration throughout all

decision-making processes.'

Become a Supporter

This newspaper has been a central part of community life for many years. Our industry faces testing times, which is why we're asking for your support. Every contribution will help us continue to produce local journalism that makes a measurable difference to our community.

Become a Supporter