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Parachute jump in aid of daughter

PUBLISHED: 11:20 16 May 2008 | UPDATED: 20:23 05 July 2010

A LOWESTOFT mum is preparing to undertake the biggest challenge of her life, for the love of her daughter.

Mandy Coffill is doing a parachute jump this summer to help raise money for the Make a Wish Foundation, which is currently helping her daughter Hannah's dream come true after she was diagnosed with a brain tumour.

A LOWESTOFT mum is preparing to undertake the biggest challenge of her life, for the love of her daughter.

Mandy Coffill is doing a parachute jump this summer to help raise money for the Make a Wish Foundation, which is currently helping her daughter Hannah's dream come true after she was diagnosed with a brain tumour.

Hannah, who has been undergoing treatment since October last year, is one of the first children in the country to have her type of treatment outside a 10-year clinical trial, with a dual approach of chemotherapy and radiotherapy.

And the charity has arranged for the nine-year-old and her family to go on a shopping spree in London by pink limousine.

They will stay in a top hotel, and the Whitton Green Primary School pupil will be given spending money and a personal shopper to help her buy whatever she would like.

To express their gratitude to the charity, the mother of three and husband Lee will travel to Old Buckenham Airfield on Saturday, July 19, where Hannah will be waiting for her mother to freefall from 12,000ft.

“It's our way of saying thank you to the charity for helping Hannah. I have never done anything like this before, I'm really nervous,” said Mandy, 34, who lives in Carlton Colville.

Mandy, who is a part-time special constable for Suffolk Police, said her colleagues had been amazing, rallying round to collect £300 towards the jump already.

She also told of a woman who she met shopping at Asda, who had raised £150 for her, while Beach Radio are donating £100 from their Help an East Coast Child Appeal.

Hannah was diagnosed after she had been experiencing a number of headaches.

“They referred her to the James Paget University Hospital and they couldn't find anything, she had no double vision and no symptoms, apart from the fact she was drinking a lot of fluids,” said Mandy. “She was then sent for an MRI scan.

“We were about to go and see my mum and then to a wedding in Poland. The doctors said not to worry and they would see us when we came back.”

When they returned Mandy and Lee were told they had found a mass in Hannah's head and she was sent to Addenbrooke's Hospital in Cambridge where specialists found it had grown.

It was found she had a rare tumour named Hypothalamic Chiasmal Germinoma, mostly found in teenage boys. Only 60 cases are reported a year in the UK and in Hannah's case it was sitting on the pituitary gland, also causing diabetes insipidus and hormone deficiencies.

Hannah finished her gruelling treatment at the end of March and must now wait until next month to find out how the treatment has gone, but she remains positive, cheerful and an inspiration to other youngsters.

If you would like to support Mandy, you can sponsor her by logging on to www.justgiving.com/makeawishjump

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