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Police use new laws to control drinkers

PUBLISHED: 16:05 06 April 2010 | UPDATED: 16:59 06 July 2010

POLICE tackling alcohol-related anti-social behaviour in Waveney are using a new law to control disorderly drinkers.

Officers from Suffolk police have started using civil Drinking Banning Orders (DBO) to protect the public from people who misuse alcohol and to help drinkers get help.

POLICE tackling alcohol-related anti-social behaviour in Waveney are using a new law to control disorderly drinkers.

Officers from Suffolk police have started using civil Drinking Banning Orders (DBO) to protect the public from people who misuse alcohol and to help drinkers get help.

DBOs work in a similar way to Anti-Social Behaviour Orders (ASBO) and can be made against anyone over 16 who has been involved in crime or disorderly behaviour after drinking in order to prevent their behaviour from continuing.

Police and local authorities are working together to use the new legislation, which came into force last year and has now been used in Suffolk for the first time.

Dick Woodrow, Waveney District Council's senior licensing officer, said that the new orders are an additional tool to help to protect bar and pub staff from potential violence.

He said: “The majority of people do behave responsibly, but those looking to cause trouble following the excessive consumption of alcohol can cause distress or harm to others.

“Staff working in pubs, bars and eateries and those using our night time economy have a right to enjoy themselves without the fear of violence form a minority.

“We are working together to combat such anti-social behaviour and Waveney District Council as a licensing authority is pleased to support the police in using the DBO - another important tool in our joint effort to combat crime and disorder in and around licensed premises.”

Over the next twelve months, DBOs will be introduced as an additional sentencing option for magistrates and people given an order will have the chance to complete a Positive Behaviour Intervention course which focuses on how drinking impacts their health and other people.

A court can order that a DBO has any conditions which are needed to stop the alcohol-related crime or disorder, for example banning someone from entering pubs and licensed premises, and the order can last for between two months and two years.

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