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Privilege to be part of Blue's season

PUBLISHED: 11:52 19 May 2008 | UPDATED: 20:25 05 July 2010

WHAT an emotional journey the FA Vase has been.

From the first couple of rounds, where you think about just holding your own and trying to show the family of non-league football you can do, to getting into the quarters at Concord thinking "Wembley? No, surely not?"

Winning 4-0 at home in the semi, trying not to brash about the return leg, but unable to help but think that you already have one foot inside the national stadium and then just a week later, thinking you could be about to be escorted out, with only 19 minutes gone, only to be told 71 minutes later that your ticket is valid and you are there.

WHAT an emotional journey the FA Vase has been.

From the first couple of rounds, where you think about just holding your own and trying to show the family of non-league football you can do, to getting into the quarters at Concord thinking “Wembley? No, surely not?”

Winning 4-0 at home in the semi, trying not to brash about the return leg, but unable to help but think that you already have one foot inside the national stadium and then just a week later, thinking you could be about to be escorted out, with only 19 minutes gone, only to be told 71 minutes later that your ticket is valid and you are there.

And then to see the players walk out to such a buzz, sing the National Anthem in a national cup final, because they are playing in it and not just watching.

The own goal flying in and the gods looking like they might again be on our side with some last ditch defending from both players and woodwork.

But it in the end it was not to be. How many emotions were used in those 96 minutes, never mind the whole of the run?

But I for one, would not have missed any of it for the world and I don't think anymore could have been asked from either the players or managers at any time.

You only had to see the tears and body language when the final whistle went.

But for me, what happened just seconds after that summed up what everyone at the club means to each other. The players and managers pushed the tears back as far as they could and came straight over to the fans and applauded them.

They didn't have to, but they wanted to, and for me, that meant a lot.

Couldn't help but let out a tear or two after that and, rightly or wrongly, couldn't stay and watch the Kirkham & Wesham fans and players jump around, once our boys had left.

It's been a privilege to have been able to be a part of what's happened this season, if only from the behind the touch line, and only have good memories from it.

So to Mick, Ady and all the lads that have given their all thanks you.

RICKY BILVERSTONE

Lowestoft

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