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Pupils celebrate GCSE successes

PUBLISHED: 12:01 08 May 2009 | UPDATED: 09:27 06 July 2010

COMPUTER whizz kids at one Lowestoft school have gained their GCSE in ICT two years ahead of schedule.

A massive 90pc of year nine pupils at Benjamin Britten High have passed their OCR national award in the subject, perhaps placing them in a minority of students nationwide.

COMPUTER whizz kids at one Lowestoft school have gained their GCSE in ICT two years ahead of schedule.

A massive 90pc of year nine pupils at Benjamin Britten High have passed their OCR national award in the subject, perhaps placing them in a minority of students nationwide.

And several achieved a distinction, which is equivalent to an A grade.

To pass the course students were tested on the core skills of ICT, as well as producing portfolios of their work.

They had to present evidence of skills in word processing, database creation, digital photo manipulation and website design.

The course is designed to encourage pupils to become independent enquirers and show high levels of personal organisation in producing work to a deadline.

Alongside the year nine students, 81pc of year 10 passed the GCSE, with 21 pupils awarded two distinctions, giving them the equivalent of two A-grade GSCE's, a year early.

In year nine, distinctions were handed out to Antony Dinsdale, Myles Cooper, Tom Thurston and twins Amber and Opal Gibbs, amongst others.

After being given the news Tom, 14, said he was “chuffed” while Amber expressed her shock and happiness.

Nigel Leech, head of ICT at the school in Blyford Road, said he was delighted with this year's results, particularly with students in year nine and 10.

“At the school we are happy to encourage accelerated learning and the statistics prove this has been a huge success,” he said.

Mr Leech said year nine students would not be claiming their qualifications at this stage as there was now an opportunity to achieve further GCSE's in the subject.

Headteacher Trevor Osborne said they were particularly pleased in light of their change in specialism recently to a maths and computing college.

“There are areas of Lowestoft where children are doing exceptionally well and Lowestoft has a lot to be proud of in terms of education. This reflects the quality of students we have. What the year nine students have achieved is equal to any school nationally and it's the highest achievement any child of that age can get.”

Rosalind Turner, director for children and young people at Suffolk County Council, said it was an exceptional achievement for children of 13 and 14 to achieve a GCSE.

“Congratulations to everyone concerned for their hard work and truly exceptional performance. I'd like to celebrate the school's success in this particular key area of children's learning.”

Mr Turner said the news boded well with the council's new pilot Home Access Scheme, which aims to ensure that children who cannot afford a computer have an opportunity for help with their learning and the use of internet connection. To find out if you qualify for a free computer telephone 0845 603 1842.

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