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Reassurances made over Bangfest festival

PUBLISHED: 18:28 10 July 2009 | UPDATED: 10:44 06 July 2010

ORGANISERS of a proposed 24-hour festival at the Somerleyton Estate have moved to reassure concerns of disturbance ahead of a decision on their licensing application.

ORGANISERS of a proposed 24-hour festival at the Somerleyton Estate have moved to reassure concerns of disturbance ahead of a decision on their licensing application.

The Licensing Premises Panel is set to meet on Monday to discuss an application by JGSR Events for Bangfest to take place in the grounds of the estate.

The event, which is due to take place over Saturday and Sunday, August 29 and 30, aims to recapture the spirit of the late 80's rave, with three tents offering jungle, drum and bass, electro, techno and electronica music to around 1,500 patrons.

For the festival to take place, JGSR Events has submitted a 200-page application to Waveney District Council asking for a licence to play music from 1pm on the Saturday until 4am on the Sunday, with alcohol on sale until 3am.

To date the application has received one objection, with concerns raised about the potential for noise disturbance.

John Shreeve, chairman of Somerleyton Parish Council, admitted that the council had sent a letter seeking assurance that the noise level would be kept down.

“We reacted swiftly, although with the wind it is probable that the noise will be worse for those in Blundeston, Lound and Corton. It will run until 4am with drum and bass throbbing out, so it will be a wild weekend for sleepy Somerleyton,” he said.

Sam Reid, director of JGSR Events, has admitted that he had heard of problems from past events, including Eastern Haze, but tried to reassure residents that his company has been organising concerts and events at the UEA and across London and the south coast, for 10 years.

“We sent an extensive application and are confident of being able to deliver what is required of us. Beyond 11pm there will be just two tents playing music and we will be monitoring at certain points around the site, so that if the frequency gets too high we will bring it down. We have professional trained audio engineers, who are the guys who do the sound at the main stage at Glastonbury.

“The last thing we want to do is to have an impact on the community so they don't want us back,” he said.

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