Search

Red for danger on the beach

PUBLISHED: 16:16 11 July 2008 | UPDATED: 20:51 05 July 2010

RED equals danger - and that's the important message, which is being issued to beachgoers this week.

When you go to the beach it's great to have fun with your friends and family on the sand and in the sea, but there's some important points to remember to keep yourself safe.

RED equals danger - and that's the important message, which is being issued to beachgoers this week.

When you go to the beach it's great to have fun with your friends and family on the sand and in the sea, but there's some important points to remember to keep yourself safe.

Continuing our weekly series of top tips and vital safety messages to ensure people Stay Safe This Summer, The Journal and Waveney District Council's Beach Safe campaign is calling on people who flock to the sunny sands to adhere to the rules and regulations.

Each week The Journal will remind locals of some of the key points of the campaign.

And this week an important message is being issued by the district council's lifeguards about red flags and safety information.

Lifeguard Josh Kirby said: “If you are unsure about where it is safe to swim always ask a lifeguard for advice. Take the time to look at safety signs and flags as detailed information is always posted at the lifeguard stations.

“If you see the red flags flying on the beach it means danger and it is not safe to swim. You will often see red flags if there are rough sea conditions, for example strong surf, strong winds and undercurrents.”

After getting on the beach, the tendency for most visitors - particularly children - is to rush straight into the sea. But there are some important guidelines to follow.

“You should check out the beach when you arrive. Be aware of physical hazards such as rocks, piers, groynes and breakwaters,” Mr Kirby said.

“Look for undertow currents and dangerous rip currents. If you're unsure, ask the lifeguard. Don't swim alone, it's safer with a friend, and try to make sure there are other people around - you never know when help might be needed,” he added.

“Take safety advice, and aim to swim where there is a lifeguard on patrol -- look for zoned swimming areas, marked by red and yellow flags. Look out for signs and the beach flags to ensure it is safe to swim.”

Most Read

Most Read

Latest from the Lowestoft Journal

Hot Jobs

Show Job Lists