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Royal Norfolk Show crowds set to top 100,000

PUBLISHED: 19:56 02 July 2009 | UPDATED: 10:33 06 July 2010

Tens of thousands of people headed home hot but happy after a "cracking" second day of the Royal Norfolk Show.

Organisers predicted the two-day total had topped the 100,000 mark and predicted a future as rosy as this week's sun for the two-day spectacular despite the demise of other country shows.

Tens of thousands of people headed home hot but happy after a “cracking” second day of the Royal Norfolk Show.

Organisers predicted the two-day total had topped the 100,000 mark and predicted a future as rosy as this week's sun for the two-day spectacular despite the demise of other country shows.

Ten years ago the attendance figure for the Norfolk event was below 79,000 and although that year was affected by bad weather, chief executive John Purling said this year's figure proved renewed enthusiasm for the show.

“I have spoken to people who have not been here before and they said they never realised it was so good. The future for the show in Norfolk is extremely bright and with the Royal Show finishing, I hope we will get more traders here next year.”

He added: “The contribution we are making to the Norfolk economy in terms of a shop window for food, farming and business is so greatly appreciated by everyone.”

The Costessey showground was again bathed in hot sunshine and while there were no serious problems, more than 110 people had to be treated at the medical centre.

On Wednesday the figure was 138 people and it was “far more” than normal. The majority of the incidents were heat related, such as headaches and dehydration.

The highlights on day two were again the Human Cannonball Man, the Rockwood Dog Display Team and the Falcons parachute team.

The show ended with an emotional sunset finale, which included a special tribute to personnel from RAF Marham, who have recently returned from active service in Iraq.

Insp Kate Thacker, of Norfolk Police, said police time during the show had been monopolised by lost and found children, but officers' jobs had been made far easier by the free wrist tagging systems in operation, run by the Lions Club International.

“The tagging has made a big difference, it means we can get the children and their carers back together much quicker,” said Insp Thacker.”

Insp Thacker said reported crimes had been limited to a couple of petty thefts.

*For an eight-page supplement on the second day of the show see Friday's EDP.

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