Search

Sadness at closure of residential units

PUBLISHED: 12:30 12 May 2008 | UPDATED: 20:22 05 July 2010

IT has been with great sadness that we, like so many other concerned parents/carers of sons/daughter with learning disabilities, read about the imminent closure of the residential units at Lothingland Community Unit, in Oulton.

IT has been with great sadness that we, like so many other concerned parents/carers of sons/daughter with learning disabilities, read about the imminent closure of the residential units at Lothingland Community Unit, in Oulton.

It has been suggested that it would be good for them to be tenants in their own homes, but some of the residents have no conception of financial matters, tenancies, etc. In fact many of them are unable to feed, dress, wash or toilet themselves.

For these people it seems to us that the decision to move them from the safe environment, which is their homes and their familiar carers and friends, to a strange place and unfamiliar people borders on the cruel and inhumane.

In addition to the residential units closing we have been informed that the respite unit, which is a lifeline to those of us with our offspring still living at home, is earmarked for closure next year.

When that happens those of us who access Lothingland for respite will probably be transferred to other respite units such as John Turner House Respite Unit.

At the moment there are five beds at John Turner House and we have been informed that this will be increased to seven, but we doubt that this will make up the shortfall caused by the closure of Lothingland.

Regular respite is an absolute necessity for those of us caring for our sons/daughters at home and we, and many other parents we know, are extremely worried about this situation.

We're told our people will have more choice but as most of them are unable to speak for themselves and are having these changes thrust upon them what choice do they really have?

We sincerely hope and pray that someone, somewhere, will wake up to what is happening and try to reverse the process, we fear though it is too late.

It seems our people are penalised for being the most vulnerable people in our society. Surely a prosperous, caring society, should take care of those unable to take care of themselves in a compassionate way rather than take decisions which will cause some of them undoubted trauma and distress.

GILL and ALAN MOORE

Via email

Most Read

Most Read

Latest from the Lowestoft Journal

Hot Jobs

Show Job Lists