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Seagulls

PUBLISHED: 12:39 09 September 2008 | UPDATED: 21:14 05 July 2010

THE decision to write to The Journal regarding the problems that I and many others have experienced with the colonisation of residential areas by seagulls was not taken lightly.

THE decision to write to The Journal regarding the problems that I and many others have experienced with the colonisation of residential areas by seagulls was not taken lightly.

The response by one writer in support of seagulls was, therefore, somewhat surprising, in view of the fact that she openly stated that she had not heard the screeching of the birds.

It is also disconcerting to find such intolerance and that genuine concerns are dismissed as mere moans. She may be assured that long-term sleep deprivation generates more than moans.

There are times when human interest has to subsume that of other animals.

Culling a few hundred seagulls is not likely to significantly alter the balance of the human/nature relationship and the fact that seagulls are probably culled merely in order to study the stomach contents, is to some, scientifically justified.

I would say again, that seagulls are blanket protected within the Wildlife and Countryside Act. They are not a specific endangered species and therefore such birds that are indentified as a nuisance and a potential health hazard to humans may be culled. Rather than shooting the birds the eggs may be smashed. I am not advocating mass extermination of seagulls; if as the writer suggests, we humans have caused the problem, let us now deal with the solution scientifically, not emotionally.

It is a little quieter now, as the majority of gulls have moved to wherever they go to in winter. However, come spring, with hormones in overdrive, they will return at which point Waveney District Council will be requested to take action under legislation that protects our quality of life.

T M TRELAWNY GOWER

Windsor Road

Lowestoft

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