Storms uncover another large Suffolk shipwreck

Shipwreck remains on the beach at Covehithe

Shipwreck remains on the beach at Covehithe - Credit: Stephen Sugg

Recent winter storms have re-uncovered another large shipwreck on the Suffolk coast. 

A large wooden section of a boat has been found at Covehithe, north of Southwold.  

Stephen Sugg, from Saxmundham, was walking along Covehithe beach with his wife over the weekend when the pair came across the remains of a large ship. 

"It was really nice to go and look at," said Mr Sugg. "It was quite impressive."

The shipwreck has been spotted on the beach before, almost three years ago. The ship's remains have regularly been covered up by sand and shingle moving on the beach. 

The impressive craftsmanship of the boat remains after centuries buried

The impressive craftsmanship of the boat remains after centuries buried - Credit: Stephen Sugg

The recent bad weather has uncovered the ship, allowing the public to see the remains once again. 

Mr Sugg said that what remained of the shipwreck appeared to have been worn away a little more since it was last visible on the beach. 

Much of the hull is put together with wooden nails

Much of the hull is put together with wooden nails - Credit: Stephen Sugg

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Judging by the wooden trenails used to keep the ship together, it's understood that the ship could date back to the 18th or 19th century.

There were many shipwrecks across the Suffolk coast during this period. 

The remains of a ship at Covehithe

The remains of a ship at Covehithe - Credit: Stephen Sugg

It's the second time in recent weeks that remains of a large shipwreck have been spotted again on the Suffolk coast. 

Last week, a piece of a shipwreck, also thought to date from the 18th century was uncovered on the beach at Thorpeness. 

The wreck is also made of wood and also features wooden trenails. 

It's thought  the wreck there could be part of a warship or collier ship but has yet to be formally identified. 

It is believed that the Thorpeness boat could have been a similar size to Captain Cook's Endeavour. 

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