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Students flying high

PUBLISHED: 14:43 22 August 2008 | UPDATED: 21:07 05 July 2010

STUDENTS opening their GCSEs yesterday achieved a mixed bag of results, which has left one Lowestoft school vowing to check the marks.

Headteachers at both Benjamin Britten and Denes High School's in Lowestoft said they were pleased with the encouraging pass rates, while pupils at Saint Felix School at Southwold maintained steady grades.

STUDENTS opening their GCSEs yesterday achieved a mixed bag of results, which has left one Lowestoft school vowing to check the marks.

Headteachers at both Benjamin Britten and Denes High School's in Lowestoft said they were pleased with the encouraging pass rates, while pupils at Saint Felix School at Southwold maintained steady grades.

But over at Kirkley High School in Lowestoft, headteacher John Clinton said he was going to be contacting the exam boards to verify the results, as they did not reflect the targets.

Only 29pc of students received five or more A* to C grades, including English and maths, while just 42pc got five or more A* to C passes in any subject.

Mr Clinton said: “This year's five plus A* to C pass rates are below our targets and expectations. However, almost a quarter of the year group gained a C plus pass in English or Maths, but not in both.

“This is a disproportionate number and not consistent with the school's track record. We will therefore be asking the exam boards to check the marking very closely. I am hopeful that this will improve the results published today.”

Meanwhile at Benjamin Britten High School 37pc of students managed five or more A* to C grades, including English and maths - a 5pc increase on last year. Around 60pc of students also received five or more A* to C grades in any subject, although this was 5pc down on results in 2007.

Headteacher Trevor Osborne said he was delighted with the results: “The results show that around 26pc of our students got 10 or more GSCE's at A* to C, which I am really pleased about and they have shown improvement in English and maths again this year.”

Benjamin Britten High School also produced four outstanding students, who between them managed 54 GSCE's.

Hannah Douglas, 16, got 13 GSCEs, seven of which were A* and A, Craig Gosling, 16, received 14 GSCE's, all A*, As and Bs, Benjamin Kirk, 16, got 13 GSCEs, with nine at A* and A, while Bonnie Sayer, 16, who hopes to be a doctor, got 14 GSCE's, six of which were A and A*.

Denes High School also produced a number of successes.

Imogene Fletcher was celebrating after being awarded 11 A*s and one A, including two exams she took a year early and a distinction in a national certificate for business, the equivalent of four GCSEs.

She said: “I really didn't think I would do that well, I was predicted good grades, but after history and chemistry I didn't think I had done very well. I'm really pleased and I tried my best. I will go to sixth form and definitely want to go to university.”

Fellow student Rebecca Lo got four A*s and six As, as well as taking two exams last year. She plans to go to sixth form and possibly study medicine at university.

Kinga Przygoda and Sara Pimpicka, only arrived in the UK from Poland two years ago, but still managed 20 GCSEs between them. Kinga said: “I could only say hello and how are you when I came here and the exams were quite difficult.”

Overall, 30pc of students achieved five or more A* to C grades, including maths and English, 2pc more than last year, while 58pc received five or more A* to C grades in any subject - a 12pc increase on last year.

Headteacher Mick Lincoln said they were the best results since the school became a comprehensive: “We are very pleased; it's a credit to the students who worked very hard and the support they received from parents. Also credit to my staff for all the hard work they put in.”

Saint Felix School in Southwold again produced high figures with 86pc of students achieving five or more passes at A* to C including English and maths, and in all subjects. There was also 9pc of students who produced A* grades alone.

Headteacher David Ward said: “I'm very pleased with all of my students. Their English grades are particularly good as are the art and performing arts subjects.”

At Lowestoft College, students sat psychology, maths and English GSCEs, with 10pc more students achieving A* to C grades, compared with last year.

Ros Pugh, vice principal for quality and students said: “Some students hold down part and full time jobs, others are undertaking full time vocational courses also and others with many responsibilities outside of learning. We are really proud of them and of our tutors and managers who have worked so hard to help them to gain their qualifications.”

Results to date: (The last three years percentages are in brackets, beginning with 2007)

Saint Felix School, Southwold: GSCE pass rate of five or more A* to C, including English and maths, 86pc (85pc) (87pc) (52pc).

GSCE pass rate of five or more A* to C grades in any subjects 86pc (89pc) (91pc) (88pc)

Denes High School, Lowestoft: GSCE pass rate of five or more A* to C, including English and maths 30pc (28pc) (27pc) (28pc).

GSCE pass rate of five or more A* to C grades in any subjects 58pc (44pc) (39pc) (39pc)

Benjamin Britten High School, Lowestoft: GSCE pass rate of five or more A* to C, including English and maths, 37pc (31pc) (32pc) (32pc)

GSCE pass rate of five or more A* to C grades in any subjects, 60pc (65pc) (61.4pc) (65pc)

Kirkley High School, Lowestoft: GSCE pass rate of five or more A* to C, including English and maths 29pc (32pc) (32pc) (32pc).

GSCE pass rate of five or more A* to C grades in any subjects 42pc (46pc) (46.2pc) (43pc)

Lowestoft College: The college offers only three GSCEs so the five-plus measure is not relevant.

Sir John Leman High School, Beccles GSCE pass rate of five or more A* to C, including English and maths,

48pc (49pc) (47pc) (45pc)

GSCE pass rate of five or more A* to C grades in any subjects, 72pc (65pc) (61pc) (54pc)


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