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Students' hard work for exams pays off

PUBLISHED: 11:05 28 August 2009 | UPDATED: 11:44 06 July 2010

Kirkley High School students Kieran Flatt and Carlos Santos celebrating their results

Kirkley High School students Kieran Flatt and Carlos Santos celebrating their results

THE anxious wait for hundreds of teenagers in and around Lowestoft and Southwold ended yesterday as they received their GCSE exam results.

As 16-year-olds digested their joy or disappointment, the early signs were that the region's results had improved once again.

THE anxious wait for hundreds of teenagers in and around Lowestoft and Southwold ended yesterday as they received their GCSE exam results.

As 16-year-olds digested their joy or disappointment, the early signs were that the region's results had improved once again.

Across England, results improved yet again overall, with two-thirds of exams awarded at least a C grade. Local students also proved that hard work pays off with good results from all of the Lowestoft high schools.

At Kirkley High School, 31.4pc of students gained five A*-C grades including maths and English, and 41.5pc got five A*-C GCSEs in any subjects - the school's best results for the last five years.

Headteacher Richard Pickard said: “I'm so pleased. These are not only great results, but our best for five years. It means we can start the new term next week on a high and move forward from there.”

He added: “Our results clearly demonstrate that Kirkley High School has turned the corner on to the path of school improvement.”

At Benjamin Britten High School, results improved from last year with 75pc of students getting five A*-C grades in any subject and 38pc getting top grades including English and maths.

Since the school gained its status as a specialist maths and computing college, results in maths have improved by 6pc and the school now has a 94pc A*-C pass rate in ICT.

Headteacher Trevor Osborne said: “I am delighted for all the pupils and their parents. Seventy five per cent of our students have attained 5+ GCSE's A*-C, a fantastic 19pc improvement on last year showing an incredible performance by staff and pupils.”

Two pupils at the school attainted top grades across the board, as Jennifer Youngs achieved 9A*s and one A grade and Kara Paisley achieved 8 A*s and 2 A's.

Results from Denes High School also reflected a year of very hard work by pupils and staff. Twenty seven per cent of students gained five A*-C GCSE's including English and maths and 48pc gained five top grades in any subject.

Pupils at Sir John Leman High School, in Beccles, also exceeded expectations, with 49.4pc getting 5 A*-C results including English and maths and 67pc getting five top results in any subject.

Student Jude Parnell, 16, of Carlton Colville, who battled through tragedy in his personal life emerged with four Cs and above. His brother Marc died in December last year at the age of 18, and Jude ended up missing a lot of school.

“I basically had a breakdown,” he said. “But I got through it all, and I never expected to get half the grades I got.”

Mike Wilson, co-deputy at the school, added: “The relationship that we nurtured between ourselves and Jude's family to carry him through and support him was absolutely crucial.”

Saint Felix School, in Southwold, exceeded expectations with 83pc gaining five A*-C grades including English and maths, and 86pc getting five A*-C grades in any subject.

Lowestoft College, which offers four GCSE subjects alongside vocational studies, saw results improve by 1pc overall.

Vice-principal Phillip Belden said: “We are particularly pleased with the 80pc A*-C for English, which is well above the national average. Psychology had a 100pc pass rate. Students are mostly taking these courses in addition to undertaking a full vocational training course therefore we are particularly proud of the success of the staff and students year on year.”

Suffolk County Council has a free advice service for students and parents. Visit the Youth Connexions website at www.thesource.me.uk or telephone 0800 085 4448.


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