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Supermoon sightings affected by the weather over Lowestoft and Southwold

PUBLISHED: 10:24 15 November 2016 | UPDATED: 10:24 15 November 2016

The full moon photographed from the North Denes in Lowestoft on Sunday, November 13. Picture: ANDREW LEES

The full moon photographed from the North Denes in Lowestoft on Sunday, November 13. Picture: ANDREW LEES

Archant

The moon was at its brightest in almost 70 years, but as sky-gazers enjoyed the rare treat of a “supermoon,” cloud cover obstructed the views over Suffolk and Norfolk.

Supermoon over Southwold Pier. Photo: Colin BarleySupermoon over Southwold Pier. Photo: Colin Barley

The supermoon phenomenon occurs when a full moon is at perigee – the point when the moon is closest to Earth – which causes it to appear to be much bigger and brighter than usual.

And about 5.30pm last night (Monday), as the moon reached the closest to Earth that it has been since January 26, 1948, clouds prevented the best views – however, enthusiasts may have better luck this evening (Tuesday) as the moon remains bright and large.

While there was a supermoon last month, and another is expected to take place on December 14, the next time the moon will be as close to Earth will be November 25, 2034, when it will pass within 221,485 miles.

■ Send us your supermoon pictures to lowestoft.journal@archant.co.uk


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