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Toast it with a cuppa!

PUBLISHED: 09:10 08 February 2008 | UPDATED: 19:40 05 July 2010

A LOWESTOFT ex-pat has been teaching our American cousins the secret of making a good cup of tea.

Glenys Duis (nee Rawston) lived in Kirkley Gardens before immigrating to America as a GI bride, where she now lives in Emmetsburg, Minnesota.

A LOWESTOFT ex-pat has been teaching our American cousins the secret of making a good cup of tea.

Glenys Duis (nee Rawston) lived in Kirkley Gardens before immigrating to America as a GI bride, where she now lives in Emmetsburg, Minnesota.

The town is named after Robert Emmet, an Irish patriot who was executed aged 25 in Dublin for leading an Irish uprising in 1803.

Friends of Glenys, knowing she was English and is a volunteer in the local gift shop of the St Patrick's Association, invited her to demonstrate the old English tradition of high tea to members of the Emmetsburg Robert Emmet Society.

Each year the association commemorates the life and death of the town's namesake whose statue stands in the town.

This year members decided to hold a mass tea-making ceremony as part of their commemoration including all the paraphernalia of fine china, tablecloths, teapots, cucumber sandwiches and scones.

In a land where coffee is king, the art of making a good cup of tea is a mystery to many Americans, Glenys said.

“If you ask for a cup of tea in the USA you either receive it iced or if you specify hot tea, you get a teabag and a jug of water.”

After telephoning her friends at home in England and other ex-pats in Minnesota to make sure she got it right Glenys told the Robert Emmet Society members to bring teapots, scones and tablecloths while she supplied home-made jam tarts and lemon curd tarts as well as the English tea and cake.

Items such as the fruit cake, tea and lemon curd are products not widely available in the US and were purchased from a local store specialising in English products.

The day was a huge success with everyone turning out in their best clothes and hats to enjoy what the local newspaper, The Reporter, described as “an afternoon social gathering in Ireland and England, normally attended by the elite with tea and light refreshments served.”

“Everyone loved it,” said Glenys “The pots of English tea especially went down well with people vowing to go out and buy tea. It was such a success they intend to make the high tea an annual event.”

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