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Tribute to woman trampled to death by cows

PUBLISHED: 07:57 11 June 2009 | UPDATED: 10:04 06 July 2010

A picturesque part of the Norfolk countryside became a fitting tribute yesterday to a probation worker who was killed by cows.

Sandra Pearce, 45, was trampled to death by cattle as she was out walking her dogs in the grounds of South Elmham Hall, near Bungay, last April.

A picturesque part of the Norfolk countryside became a fitting tribute yesterday to a probation worker who was killed by cows.

Sandra Pearce, 45, was trampled to death by cattle as she was out walking her dogs in the grounds of South Elmham Hall, near Bungay, last April.

Miss Pearce, from Worlingham, near Beccles, worked as a probation officer in Lowestoft and one of the main joys of her life was taking her two Jack Russells for long walks in the Suffolk and Norfolk countryside.

Yesterday half a dozen of her colleagues from the probation service gathered at a tranquil glade in Fairhaven Woodland and Water Gardens at South Walsham, near Yarmouth, to plant a tree in her memory.

Fairhaven was chosen as Miss Pearce enjoyed waking there and the Cercis Canadensis, or forest pansy, tree was picked for its pink flowers as she loved pastel colours.

Suffolk probation area chief officer John Budd, who planted the tree, said: “Sandra loved being out in the East Anglian countryside walking her dogs and this memorial seems a fitting tribute to her.

“She had a warm personality and a great sense of humour and she was quite happy to tease me as chief probation officer.

“Sandra loved her work and was a committed and dedicated probation officer who wanted to make a real difference to offenders' lives.”

Miss Pearce had been a probation worker for 15 years and had worked in Norfolk and at Blundeston Prison before transferring to Lowestoft office in Whapload Road in February 2006. She left a sister and a niece in London.

Miss Pearce was trampled by cows as she walked at South Elmham Hall on the afternoon April 27.

When her body was found in a field about 25 cows, a mix of Simmental and British Whites, were surrounding it.

An inquest in August heard her injuries were consistent with being struck by something large and heavy and it was unknown if her two dogs had been let off their or had slipped leads around the cows.

Suffolk coroner Peter Dean recorded a verdict of accidental death.

At the time he said: “What seems to have happened is a very tragic accident and some way or another the cattle were disturbed causing them to behave in this very uncharacteristic manner.”

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