Two week sping clean for Suffolk

A TWO-week spring clean of Suffolk will take place from the end of the month with members of the public encouraged to take part.Suffolk County Council has joined forces with BBC Radio Suffolk to promote its campaign against litter and fly tipping.

A TWO-week spring clean of Suffolk will take place from the end of the month with members of the public encouraged to take part.

Suffolk County Council has joined forces with BBC Radio Suffolk to promote its campaign against litter and fly tipping.

Suffolk Spring Clean will run from March 30 to April 12 throughout the county. All the borough and district councils will be loaning out free equipment including bags and litter picks.

Councillor Jeremy Pembroke, leader of Suffolk County Council said: 'This is a wonderful initiative and one that makes a real difference to Suffolk. I hope that everyone will take part and work together to help Suffolk become the greenest county.'


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Fed up with all the rubbish on the side of the roads and in many natural beauty spots, Mark Murphy, BBC Radio Suffolk's Breakfast Show presenter launched the 'Don't be a Tosser' campaign last year.

It was such a success it is being re-launched to coincide with Suffolk Spring Clean week.

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Mr Murphy said: 'When you drive around Suffolk now you can really notice a difference. The A14 in particular was disgusting and it seems people were just tossing their bottles and bags out of their car or lorry window. Since we launched the campaign councils, businesses, groups and individuals have all rallied around to help tidy the place up. It's been a great success'.

If you wish to take part in a litter pick or even organise one yourself, contact your local borough and district councils. Contact details are available on the www.greensuffolk.org website and the BBC Radio Suffolk website, www.bbc.co.uk/suffolk

Meanwhile, a new report launched today by the think tank Policy Exchange and the Campaign to Protect Rural England (CPRE) highlights the blight of littering in Britain.

The report, called Litterbugs, proposes new means of cracking down on those responsible.

Author Bill Bryson, who is president of the CPRE and lives in Norfolk, said: 'As this report also says, we need community buy-in to the fight against litter - we must build civic pride in clean and tidy environments, with communities competing to be spotless. Only then can we stop the exasperating and routine vandalism of a country so rich in natural, cultural and built heritage.'

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