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Unique tree house must be pulled down

PUBLISHED: 12:00 08 September 2009 | UPDATED: 11:59 06 July 2010

A unique tree house which became the centre of a year long planning battle will be torn down this week.

A unique tree house which became the centre of a year long planning battle will be torn down this week.

A unique tree house which became the centre of a year long planning battle will be torn down this week.

The wondrous 21ft high structure, which Adam Jackson and his friends built in the garden on his mother's home in Brandon Parva, near Norwich, hit the headlines in 2007 after South Norfolk District Council refused to grant retrospective planning permission for it.

A unique tree house which became the centre of a year long planning battle will be torn down this week.

The wondrous 21ft high structure, which Adam Jackson and his friends built in the garden on his mother's home in Brandon Parva, near Norwich, hit the headlines in 2007 after South Norfolk District Council refused to grant retrospective planning permission for it.

But though Mr Jackson fought a strong campaign to save his beloved tree top den, and gained support from environmental charities as well as thousands of individuals along the way, The Planning Inspectorate refused his appeal and he was given 12 months to take down the structure last August.

On Thursday the 23-year-old youth worker will begin the “heartbreaking” process of dismantling it.

He said: “It will be sad as it has been quite an emotional roller coaster.

“We had such great times up there. It is heartbreaking.”

The tree house, which was built several years ago by Mr Jackson and his friends who wanted to enjoy the great outdoors, boasts a spiral staircase, leaded windows and wooden beams.

It was built using second hand materials to ensure it was as environmentally friendly as possible and cost little more than £30 to build.

However, when Mr Jackson discovered he had to get planning permission the cost soon grew as he had to pay £135 for the initial application and then, after if was refused by South Norfolk District Council, go onto appeal.

But Mr Jackson is philosophical about his loss and does not regret the build.

He said: “It has been a journey and it has really made us think a lot.

“This will be one of the big stories in our lives. One of the things we tell our grandchildren about.”

During Mr Jackson's campaign to save the tree house his story was taken up by local and national media. He got hundreds of signatures on a petition and more than 1,300 people signed up to his Facebook group dedicated to saving it.

He said: “During the process we have been in touch will all levels of government and all types of media.

“We have had support from thousands of people and from three environmental charities including Friends of the Earth.”

Mr Jackson expects the demolition process to take three days.

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