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Where's your home on the East Anglian Monopoly board?

PUBLISHED: 12:47 08 July 2019 | UPDATED: 14:01 08 July 2019

Where is your home on the Monopoly board of property prices? Pic: Getty images

Where is your home on the Monopoly board of property prices? Pic: Getty images

Is your home the Mayfair or Park Lane of East Anglian Monopoly? Or more to the Old Kent Road end of town? Now a business has created its own version of the famous board game to help property buyers and sellers.

Where does your home sit on the board of Monopoly in terms of house prices? Pic: submittedWhere does your home sit on the board of Monopoly in terms of house prices? Pic: submitted

The new board is available for Norwich, Ipswich and Lowestoft and has a few other changes from the original - instead of the 'Go to Jail' square, it's 'Go to Your In-Laws' which for some might be considered worse that the clink.

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The original Monopoly game. Pic: ArchantThe original Monopoly game. Pic: Archant

And rather than 'Free Parking' you get something much more lucrative, 'Free Council Tax'.

Editions of the actual board game, created in 1935, for local destinations like Norwich have been available for years but this version of Monopoly has been created using actual current house prices in different postcode areas.

At the bottom of the board are all the streets as cards with a tab which takes you to an online street view version of the actual address showing the real houses.

So where does your home feature? Not surprisingly, in Norwich the Golden Triangle is in the purple squares. Mayfair and Park Lane are replaced by Church Avenue, off Christchurch Road, and Fairfield Road, off Lime Tree Road, both in NR2, with values of £1.09m and £965,000.

The Lowestoft version of Monopoly in terms of house prices. Pic: submittedThe Lowestoft version of Monopoly in terms of house prices. Pic: submitted

Meanwhile, offering super value and definitely viable for a hotel, the 'Old Kent Road' and 'Whitechapel Road' of the original brown squares are replaced with Woodhall Rise, New Costessey, NR5 at £39,660 and Norris Court, Waggon & Horses Lane, NR3, at £65,000.

Meanwhile, those good addresses you wanted as they were mid-priced and meant you could usually afford a few houses at least on them, the pink Pall Mall, Whitehall and Northumberland Road are Beverley Close, NR5, Aldryche Road, NR1, and Airedale Close, NR3 all at £215,000 in the Norwich version. And the blues of the original; Angel, Islington, Euston Road and Pentonville Road are Roe Drive, NR5, at £189,750, Barclay Green, NR7 at £190,000 and Astley Road, Little Plumstead, NR13 at £190,000.

In Lowestoft, the lucrative purple squares include Broadview Road, NR32 at £816,666 and Lowestoft Road, NR32 at £537,500 with the Old Kent Road and Whitechapel being the better value Seaview Chalet park, Green Lane, Kessingland at £59,000 and London Road North at £60,000. In Ipswich, the most lucrative properties, the purple ones, were Wickerstreet Green, Kersey, IP7 at £1.715m and Burstall, IP8 at £1.35m. The cheapest, on the brown squares, were Franciscan Way, IP1 at £70,000 and Matson Road, IP1 at £63,500.

The boards were created by furnishing company Thomas Sanderson to show users which areas in their chosen city have the most and least expensive properties.

To have a go click here

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