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WWII grenades found at seafront site

PUBLISHED: 20:45 08 May 2008 | UPDATED: 20:20 05 July 2010

Bomb disposal experts were called to a Lowestoft construction site today (Thursday) after three Second World War grenades were dug up.

The seafront Orbis Energy centre site at Ness Point was cordoned off after the SIP grenades, which were issued to the Home Guard, were discovered at 3.

Bomb disposal experts were called to a Lowestoft construction site today (Thursday) after three Second World War grenades were dug up.

The seafront Orbis Energy centre site at Ness Point was cordoned off after the SIP grenades, which were issued to the Home Guard, were discovered at 3.20pm.

An army bomb disposal team was brought in from Colchester and gave the all-clear by about 6.30pm.

A police spokesman said no controlled explosions were carried out, but that the phosphorus devices were made safe and then buried in reinforced concrete.

The site at Ness Point was evacuated, but the police said there was no danger to members of the public.

The milk bottle-sized SIP, or Self-Igniting Phosphorus, grenades were issued to Britain's Home Guard during the war so volunteers could throw them at invading Nazi troops and tanks. The white phosphorus burns fiercely on contact with the air.

The grenades were never used and, not knowing what to do with them, the Home Guard often buried them. As a result they are still being found today.

The landmark Orbis Energy centre is due to open later this year and will house companies involved in the renewable energy industry.

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