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Go for a Burton

PUBLISHED: 13:24 14 May 2010 | UPDATED: 17:22 06 July 2010

Anthony Ogogo is preparing to spoil the champion's night as he aims to become a two-time Amateur Boxing Association champion.

The 21-year-old takes on Manchester's reigning champ Hosea Burton at York Hall, Bethnal Green, tonight in a bid to be crowned as the country's best amateur middleweight boxer.

Anthony Ogogo is preparing to spoil the champion's night as he aims to become a two-time Amateur Boxing Association champion.

The 21-year-old takes on Manchester's reigning champ Hosea Burton at York Hall, Bethnal Green, tonight in a bid to be crowned as the country's best amateur middleweight boxer.

Ogogo will go into the fight having yet to concede a single point in reaching the final - which is a record for the event.

And now the former welterweight ABA champion wants to round off his perfect run by putting the mouthy Burton in his place.

“He's a good fighter, but his mouth's as big as his body,” Ogogo said.

“He's really tall and I boxed him at the junior ABAs in the final five years ago and I beat him. He went quiet for a bit but all of a sudden he's popped up and is shouting his mouth off. He thinks he's the best in the world but he's going to get a shock.”

Ogogo, who is part of the Great Britain podium squad for the London 2012 Olympics based in Sheffield, believes he has got the ability and plan to beat Burton.

“I've watched a tape of Burton's last fight and he's just ridiculously tall,” he said.

“I don't think he's particularly strong but because he's got such long arms, if he does catch you it's going to hurt a bit because it's coming fro such a long distance and has got a lot of whip behind it.

“I'm just going to apply the same tactics I did in my last fight and get into him and try to box him.

“He's not going to be as fit as me or as strong as me and I don't think he's going to want it as much either.

“After the first round I just want him to realise he doesn't want to be in the ring with me anymore so I'm going to jump on him from the off. I don't mean just rough him up but outbox him and stay on his chest throughout the whole first round and I want to be five or six points up after the first round.

“He's very negative and just runs and tries to catch people with shots rather than stand and have it out.”

Despite winning his ABA title two years ago, Ogogo says he has had to completely change his style of fighting to get to grips with the relatively new scoring system in amateur boxing.

Now bouts are three three-minute round rather than four two-minute rounds and the scores are generally lower.

Ogogo has had to step up his defence to remain a force in the amateur game - and failing to concede a point proves he has done just that.

“I haven't conceded a point yet. I'm quite pleased with that record and hopefully I'll continue that in the final. It'd be brilliant to beat him 10-0 and beat him easily without losing a point.

“Or even better knocking him out and sitting on the ring apron and telling the cameras 'I'm ABA champion without losing a point and it's never been done before'.

“But as long as I win, I don't mind how I win really.

“Nobody likes getting hit but I think that's something I used to do. I've always had a good workrate and I've always thrown plenty of shots but I think my mentality before was that as long as I land my own shots I didn't mind taking a couple.

“Defence is massive and now I concentrate a lot more on my defence than attack. I've had change my style completely.

“I used to be a back foot fighter and let people come and I used to pick them off when they came. I didn't mind taking a few shots to land my own, but now inside of four two-minute rounds, it's three three-minute rounds so I've had to slow my feet down and just impose myself onto the fight more and dominate from the centre and go forwards rather than waiting for people to come on to me.

“It's taken me a year to get used to the new format, but now I feel I'm in great form and I'm not getting hit because my defence is a lot better than it used to be.”

While Ogogo is fully focused on tonight, the Olympic Games in two years are still his ultimate goal. Winning at York Hall will cement his position as the leading middleweight in the country and boost his chances of being picked to fight in London in 2012.

“As though I'm seen as the British number one, I'm boxing in the European Championships in Moscow next month, there's three, four, five boys who all want that number one spot and with a couple of big performances they could nick it,” he said.

“But if I win the ABA title, I'm quite sure I can guarantee my place as number one and cement my place in the squad permanently.

“At the minute, every fight is the biggest of my career, as I can't rest on my laurels and say I won the in the world championships five years ago or the junior Olympics six years ago because that's a long time ago and you're only as good as your last fight.

“I'm hoping to become a two-weight ABA champion and people don't do that very often.

“The Olympics is still two years away but that's not actually a long time to prepare and box the best people in the world, but I'm looking forward to it and things are going well.”

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