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Settled team can be key to success, says Drury

PUBLISHED: 12:00 14 September 2009 | UPDATED: 12:05 06 July 2010

Adam Drury is enjoying one of football's little luxuries - a settled team - under Paul Lambert.

The Canaries left-back has seen fellow defenders come and go on a regular basis, but in the three league games under the new manager has had the comfort of knowing that Jens Berthel Askou is to his right in the centre of the defence and Simon Lappin ahead of him in midfield.

Adam Drury is enjoying one of football's little luxuries - a settled team - under Paul Lambert.

The Canaries left-back has seen fellow defenders come and go on a regular basis, but in the three league games under the new manager has had the comfort of knowing that Jens Berthel Askou is to his right in the centre of the defence and Simon Lappin ahead of him in midfield. Consistency of selection, he says, is vital.

"That's the big thing - it's not just the back four, it's the whole team as well," he said. "If you look at Charlton they haven't changed their team at all this season and the last couple of years we've changed the back four, we've had people playing out of position in the back four and it just goes to make things unsettled. If we can keep it the same and everyone keeps playing well, hopefully the team will play the same. Jens has come in and done fantastically well and he's still learning how to play the English way as well, but he has adapted perfectly."

Just as important to Drury is what's in front of him, and for once he doesn't have the unpredictability of a Darren Huckerby or, more recently, Wes Hoolahan, with Lambert preferring the more conservative Lappin.

"I think the way we play at the minute we are a lot more compact and harder to break down and it is harder for teams to get through us rather than play right through the middle of us and having Lapps in front offers you something because he can play left-back as well," he said.

"From my point of view it's a bit of a godsend. At the same time, Simon knows his job as well, he's got to get forward and create things as well - everyone is working for each other in the team."

The nine-day break between games has given Lambert and his assistant Ian Culverhouse more time on the training fields with the players.

"Realistically, before they haven't had a great chance to do things on the training ground because you have to keep the lads fresh and ready for games, whereas with this nine or 10 days we have had they have had a chance to do one or two more high intensity things on the training ground and work on specifics that they haven't had a chance to do so far," said Drury.

"Everyone knows what happened on the first day of the season when we were too easy to break down and obviously we got torn apart that day and that is something he identified and wanted to make us more solid, which we have done, you can see in the results we have had, and the goals we have conceded.

"From a defender's point of view that's great, but at the same time we have got to learn to break things down and go on and win games."

Culverhouse takes the hands-on approach in training, with Lambert the observer, but Drury has seen the difference.

"It is definitely more intense," he said. "Whenever a new manager comes in you get the new manager syndrome. Obviously the lads straight away want to impress and you want to get yourself into the team if you haven't been in it.

"It gives everyone a fresh chance. He's had new ideas and new ways of training and it's been fantastic so far and I think the lads are thoroughly enjoying it and I think the way we've played and the results we've got so far it's worked and we want to improve on that."

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