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Why City desperately need to be united

PUBLISHED: 17:29 18 May 2009 | UPDATED: 09:37 06 July 2010

CANARIES fans have always been the heart, the driving force, of Norwich City Football Club - it's not in dispute. But could they be the authors of their own downfall?

More than 18,000 fans have decided they want a season ticket in their wallet next season.

CANARIES fans have always been the heart, the driving force, of Norwich City Football Club - it's not in dispute. But could they be the authors of their own downfall?

More than 18,000 fans have decided they want a season ticket in their wallet next season.

Despite relegation.

Despite City slipping from ninth to 16th then 17th and finally 22nd since their return to the Championship in 2005.

Despite knowing the playing budget is "appropriate for League One".

Despite seeing the best players leave.

Despite the rubbish that was served up week after week last season.

The supporters are so loyal that the club knows they will come back for more, like a punchdrunk boxer who won't throw in the towel.

If only City's supporters had a Robert Kett among them, a man to lead a revolt on the city.

It's not as if they lack the numbers: the problem, as was illustrated at the fans' meeting initiated by the Norwich City Independent Supporters' Association on Thursday, is they are not united. There are so many supporters' organisations, yet only two bothered to respond when NCISA chairman John Tilson asked for their views on Delia Smith and the state of play in the corridors of power, plus the appointment of Bryan Gunn as manager.

Getting 400-plus angry fans into a room to vent their feelings was always guaranteed to produce almost unanimous agreement. It did when Robert Chase was under fire in 1996; it did when they wanted Nigel Worthington out a decade later.

It did on Thursday when everyone was firing in the same direction.

But it's too easy.

NCISA have had their say; so have members of the Norwich City Supporters' Trust; so have the Associate Directors; so have the Shareholders' Association.

But they don't all agree, by some distance, which illustrates the biggest problem - what's happening at Carrow Road has driven a huge wedge between the supporters. Many are with 'em, many are against.

It's produced an interesting social divide: the presumably more affluent members of the Associate Directors Group and the Shareholders Association are supporting the club - the rank and file of NCISA aren't.

Until they are all of a like mind, the football club will find it easier to carry on regardless. At the moment, that's not a good idea - they have three board members, plus one filling a hole. They're the same people who have been responsible for the fall from grace (which, by the way, may not have reached its nadir).

So united we stand, divided we fall and all that.

But how much worse does it have to get before the fans will be united?

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