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Film & Cinema

With its cobbled streets and historic buildings, the creative team behind hit Netflix musical Jingle Jangle: A Christmas Journey couldn’t believe their luck when they stumbled upon Norwich’s Elm Hill.

Film review NMIC

Thursday, November 19, 2020

Underwhelming short film by The Favourite director Yorgos Lanthimos sees Matt Dillon followed around a city by a woman with a mad stare

Film review Possessor (18)

Thursday, November 19, 2020

Son of David, Brandon Cronenberg has come of age with a disturbing, startling body horror movie about personality hijacking by an assassin to get close to her prey

These rough around the edges, unnerving classics remind us how Romero created a new movie genre that has come to satirise the rise of Western consumerism

Ron Howard’s screen adaptation of J.D. Vance’s potentially interesting memoir about growing up poor, serves up the standard sentimental fare about family

The wait is finally over - Jingle Jangle: A Christmas Journey has been released worldwide on Netflix, featuring Norwich’s Elm Hill as you’ve never seen it before.

Film review: Patrick

Thursday, November 12, 2020

Closing moments mar the debut feature of Peaky Blinders director Tim Mielants, about a taciturn handyman on a nudist campsite who is distraught at the loss of his hammer

If you need further confirmation that Norwich is a magical place to be, then feast your eyes on Netflix’s latest festive offering Jingle Jangle: A Christmas Journey, which features scenes shot in Elm Hill.

The late Sean Connery is an ex con under surveillance in Sidney Lumet’s 1971 thriller which offers a dark and grimy vista of America

The appeal of Jean-Luc Godard’s once revolutionary film is now painfully nostalgic but the crude and amateurish scenes retain a timeless magic

It’s not quite cinema but McQueen’s evocation of Police harassment and racial injustice in 1960s Notting Hill is compelling

Roy Andersson’s latest is all filler, no killer, but its refined vision is a pure distillation of humanity.

Film review The Human Voice

Thursday, October 29, 2020

Almodovar’s lockdown project is a half hour English language monologue about Tilda Switon’s jilted lover that feels like an exercise in acting for acting’s sake

Follow up to zombie classic Train To Busan is sentimental, with brain dead plotting annoying characters and too much CGI

Paul Steward reviews new psychological chiller Saint Maud, which can be seen at Saffron Screen on Friday, November 6 and Monday, November 9, and at Royston Picture Palace on Friday, November 13.

Remake of the Roald Dahl story switches the action to sixties Alabama but it’s little more than a boring pantomime that talks down to children

Film review: Relic (15)

Thursday, October 22, 2020

There’s slow-burn tension and creeping unease in this domestic chiller about three generations of women in a ramshackle house, but is it style over substance?

Film review Shirley (15)

Thursday, October 22, 2020

Elisabeth Moss plays the agoraphobic depressive author of The House On Haunted Hill who develops a twisted relationship with a young couple come to stay

In this sophisticated thriller, Mick Jagger is a reptilian art collector hosting an artist an art critic and an American tourist - but which one is the fake?

Film critic Paul Steward reviews The Trial of the Chicago 7, which is in cinemas now and arrives on streaming service Netflix on Friday.

Unflinchingly faithful version of Frances Hodgson Burnett’s classic children’s novel is a magical and gothic meditation on grief but central performances fail to compel

Film review: The Climb

Wednesday, October 14, 2020

This American buddy comedy with European arthouse sensibilities starts at the peak and goes gently downhill but is the start of a promising double act from Covino and Marvin

For more than 50 years Pat Church has been the face of cinema in Bury St Edmunds. As the town’s Abbeygate Cinema does its best to fight the effects of Covid, Pat Church talks about his continued passion for the moving image

Andrew Clarke

Behind the scenes portrait of Swedish filmmaker Roy Andersson working on his final film is for fans only - even the making of great films is a dull process

Film review: I Am Greta

Thursday, October 8, 2020

The story of how a Swedish schoolgirl became a global climate crisis campaigner focuses too much on the personality and too little on the issues she cares about

Film critic Paul Steward reviews The New Mutants starring Game of Thrones’ Maisie Williams.

Debra Winger and Evan Rachel Wood star as mother and daughter grifters in a heist movie with no heists, random motivations, and familial bonds that don’t ring true

Helen Reddy biopic tries to pitch the singer as a feminist icon, but the cheesy daytime TV style makers her seem as middle of the road as her music

Paul Steward reviews new Keanu Reeves and Alex Winter movie Bill & Ted Face the Music.

With the low key intimacy of a home movie, Malou Reymann’s autobiographical film about two daughters’ reaction to their trans father is quietly devastating

Craig Roberts’ film presents the world from inside the head of a woman with a mental illness leaving audiences confused and emotionally disconnected

Reality is collapsing and civilisation is ending, yet somehow Bill and Ted’s world still seems more benign than ours in a reboot that is charming but uninventive

Film review: 23 Walks

Thursday, September 17, 2020

Real life north Londoner Alison Steadman plays a lonely pensioner who strikes up a romance with fellow dog walker Dave Johns, but some dark painful secrets lurk

Film review Monsoon (12A)

Thursday, September 17, 2020

Gentle film about dislocation explores Vietnam’s national identity but its quiet strength becomes aimless by the end

The Dartmouth Park director of Suffragette shines a feminist lens on female friendship and teen life as a 15-year-old tries to raise her younger brother in East London

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